Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Doby Photography /NPR
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Nell Greenfieldboyce

Correspondent, Science Desk

Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.

With reporting focused on general science, NASA, and the intersection between technology and society, Greenfieldboyce has been on the science desk's technology beat since she joined NPR in 2005.

In that time Greenfieldboyce has reported on topics including the narwhals in Greenland, the ending of the space shuttle program, and the reasons why independent truckers don't want electronic tracking in their cabs.

Much of Greenfieldboyce's reporting reflects an interest in discovering how applied science and technology connects with people and culture. She has worked on stories spanning issues such as pet cloning, gene therapy, ballistics, and federal regulation of new technology.

Prior to NPR, Greenfieldboyce spent a decade working in print, mostly magazines including U.S. News & World Report and New Scientist.

A graduate of Johns Hopkins, earning her Bachelor's of Arts degree in social sciences and a Master's of Arts degree in science writing, Greenfieldboyce taught science writing for four years at the university. She was honored for her talents with the Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award for Young Science Journalists.

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Story Archive

On Nov. 13, 2012, a narrow corridor in the southern hemisphere experienced a total solar eclipse. The corridor lay mostly over the ocean but also cut across the northern tip of Australia where both professional and amateur astronomers gathered to watch. Romeo Durscher/NASA Goddard Space Center/Flickr hide caption

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Romeo Durscher/NASA Goddard Space Center/Flickr

Why Future Earthlings Won't See Total Solar Eclipses

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Retired astrophysicist Fred Espenak (right) and his wife, Patricia, photographed a total solar eclipse from Jinta, China, on Aug. 1, 2008. He has witnessed 27 such events and plans to be in Casper, Wyo., on Aug. 21 — depending on the forecast. Courtesy of Fred Espenak hide caption

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Courtesy of Fred Espenak

Go See It, Eclipse Chasers Urge. 'Your First Time Is Always Special'

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A total solar eclipse is visible through the clouds as seen from Vagar in the Faroe Islands in March 2015. Eric Adams/AP hide caption

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Eric Adams/AP

Scientists Prepare For 'The Most Beautiful Thing You Can See In The Sky'

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Proper eye protection is a must for anyone looking up at a solar eclipse. Eclipse glasses are far darker than regular sunglasses. Joseph Okpako/Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Okpako/Getty Images

Planning To Watch The Eclipse? Here's What You Need To Protect Your Eyes

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A pump jack at work in 2016, near Firestone, Colo. The American Exploration & Production Council, which represents oil and gas exploration firms, is one of many industry groups supporting the HONEST Act, which was passed by the House and is now with the Senate. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

GOP Effort To Make Environmental Science 'Transparent' Worries Scientists

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Eyes come in all sizes. These belong to a domestic cat (from left), an owl and an octopus. The Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin has 56,000 specimens in its collection — including 6,000 from more exotic species. From left: Andyworks, Ralf Hettler, vicmicallef/iStockPhoto hide caption

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From left: Andyworks, Ralf Hettler, vicmicallef/iStockPhoto

'One Of A Kind' Collection Of Animal Eyeballs Aids Research On Vision Problems

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The Apollo 11 capsule in in sore need of restoration, conservation specialists say, if it's to last another 50 years. Even the adhesive that helps holds stuff in place is losing its stickiness, and some objects inside are starting to pop off. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles/NPR

Moonwalkers' Apollo 11 Capsule Gets Needed Primping For Its Star Turn On Earth

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A sometimes lethal strain of H7N9 bird flu that has infected about 1,500 people in China doesn't spread easily among humans — yet. But research published Thursday suggests just a few genetic mutations might be enough to make it quite contagious. Pasieka/Science Source hide caption

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Pasieka/Science Source

A Few Genetic Tweaks To Chinese Bird Flu Virus Could Fuel A Human Pandemic

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An artist's conception of the KELT-9 system, which has a host star (left) that's almost twice as hot as our sun. The hot star blasts its nearby planet KELT-9b, leading to a dayside surface temperature of around 7,800 degrees Fahrenheit. NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (IPAC) hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (IPAC)

Scientists Discover A Scorched Planet With A Comet-Like Tail

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A plasticine caterpillar glistens with moisture while awaiting potential predator attacks in the forest of Tai Po Kau, Hong Kong. Chung Yun Tak/Science hide caption

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Chung Yun Tak/Science

Scientists Glued Fake Caterpillars On Plants Worldwide. Here's What Happened

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Tyrannosaurus rex jaws generated 8,000-pound bite forces and let the creature eat everything from duck-billed dinosaurs to triceratops. Scientific Reports hide caption

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Scientific Reports

Tyrannosaurus Rex's Bite Force Measured 8,000 Pounds, Scientists Say

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A Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Police officer wears a camera during a news conference in 2014. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Scientists Hunt Hard Evidence On How Cop Cameras Affect Behavior

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A mother and calf humpback whale swim in the Exmouth Gulf in Western Australia. Fredrik Christiansen/Functional Ecology hide caption

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Fredrik Christiansen/Functional Ecology

Recordings Reveal That Baby Humpback Whales 'Whisper' To Their Mothers

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