Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010 i
Doby Photography /NPR
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Nell Greenfieldboyce

Correspondent, Science Desk

Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.

With reporting focused on general science, NASA, and the intersection between technology and society, Greenfieldboyce has been on the science desk's technology beat since she joined NPR in 2005.

In that time Greenfieldboyce has reported on topics including the narwhals in Greenland, the ending of the space shuttle program, and the reasons why independent truckers don't want electronic tracking in their cabs.

Much of Greenfieldboyce's reporting reflects an interest in discovering how applied science and technology connects with people and culture. She has worked on stories spanning issues such as pet cloning, gene therapy, ballistics, and federal regulation of new technology.

Prior to NPR, Greenfieldboyce spent a decade working in print, mostly magazines including U.S. News & World Report and New Scientist.

A graduate of Johns Hopkins, earning her Bachelor's of Arts degree in social sciences and a Master's of Arts degree in science writing, Greenfieldboyce taught science writing for four years at the university. She was honored for her talents with the Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award for Young Science Journalists.

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Scientists say bumblebees can sense flowers' electric fields through the bees' fuzzy hairs. Jens Meyer/AP hide caption

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Bumblebees' Little Hairs Can Sense Flowers' Electric Fields
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Female Drosophila bifurca flies have an organ to store sperm (right) that male flies compete to fill, crowding out rivals. Scott Pitnick/Nature hide caption

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For Female Fruit Flies, Mr. Right Has The Biggest Sperm
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Aedes aegypti mosquito photographed through a microscope. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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CDC: 157 Pregnant Women In The U.S. Have Tested Positive For Zika
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Every bit of steel in the car you drive has been measured as to its capability to withstand certain forces — pushing and pulling. Machines like this do the measuring. Jennifer Lauren Lee/NIST PML hide caption

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How Do You Lift A Million Pounds Of Stainless Steel? Very Carefully
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These mitochondria, in red, are from the heart muscle cell of a rat. Mitochondria have been described as "the powerhouses of the cell" because they generate most of a cell's supply of chemical energy. But at least one type of complex cell doesn't need 'em, it turns out. Science Source hide caption

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This artist's concept depicts some of the planetary discoveries made by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope. Tuesday's announcement more than doubles the number of verified planets discovered by the Kepler mission. W. Stenzel/NASA hide caption

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NASA Spots 1,284 New Planets, Including 9 That Are 'Potentially Habitable'
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This artist's rendering shows what the view might look like from one of the three planets orbiting an ultracool, reddish dwarf star just 40 light-years from Earth. ESO/M. Kornmesser/Nature hide caption

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3 Strange Worlds Circling A Cool Star Might Be Prime Spots To Support Life
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Earlier this week, NIH temporarily halted work in the cell therapy lab of Dr. Steven Rosenberg, chief of surgery at the National Cancer Institute, pending a review of safety standards there. Courtesy of National Cancer Institute hide caption

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Task Force Calls For More Safety Oversight At NIH Research Hospital
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The Clinical Center on the campus of the National Institutes of Health, in Bethesda, Md., is an internationally renowned hospital where patients are also research subjects. NIH/Flickr hide caption

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(Top row, left to right) Titan, Earth's moon, Europa and Enceladus. (Bottom row, left to right) Callisto, Charon, Ariel and lo. NASA hide caption

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Hot On The Trail Of Alien Moons
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This computer-simulated image shows a supermassive black hole at the core of a galaxy. The cosmic monster's powerful gravity distorts space around it like the mirror in a fun house, smearing the light from nearby stars. NASA/ESA/D. Coe, J. Anderson and R. van der Marel (Space Telescope Science Institute) hide caption

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Supermassive Black Holes May Be More Common Than Anyone Imagined
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A worker in Claysville, Pa., shovels the fine powder that's part of a watery mixture used in hydraulic fracturing. Silica dust is created in a wide variety of construction and manufacturing industries, too. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

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Tighter, Controversial Silica Rules Aimed At Saving Workers' Lungs
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More than 20,000 babies in the U.S. were born with congenital rubella syndrome during an outbreak of rubella in 1964-65. A vaccine developed in 1969 helped curb the virus's spread but hasn't eliminated it worldwide. Public Health Image Library/CDC hide caption

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Lessons From Rubella Suggest Zika's Impact Could Linger
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Mariel Mohns and Mustafa Rasheed are working in a University of Wisconsin lab that's trying to figure out how Zika virus could be damaging fetuses. Courtesy of Kristi L. Hall hide caption

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Scientists Report In Real Time On Challenging Zika Research
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