Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010 i
Doby Photography /NPR
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Nell Greenfieldboyce

Correspondent, Science Desk

Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.

With reporting focused on general science, NASA, and the intersection between technology and society, Greenfieldboyce has been on the science desk's technology beat since she joined NPR in 2005.

In that time Greenfieldboyce has reported on topics including the narwhals in Greenland, the ending of the space shuttle program, and the reasons why independent truckers don't want electronic tracking in their cabs.

Much of Greenfieldboyce's reporting reflects an interest in discovering how applied science and technology connects with people and culture. She has worked on stories spanning issues such as pet cloning, gene therapy, ballistics, and federal regulation of new technology.

Prior to NPR, Greenfieldboyce spent a decade working in print, mostly magazines including U.S. News & World Report and New Scientist.

A graduate of Johns Hopkins, earning her Bachelor's of Arts degree in social sciences and a Master's of Arts degree in science writing, Greenfieldboyce taught science writing for four years at the university. She was honored for her talents with the Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award for Young Science Journalists.

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Male and female tungara frogs. Among these frogs, the guy with the best call usually wins the gal — except when you throw a third-choice loser into the mix. Alexander T. Baugh/Encyclopedia of Life hide caption

itoggle caption Alexander T. Baugh/Encyclopedia of Life

A brown bear in its natural habitat. Wildlife ecologists in Minnesota found that black bears in their study experienced an increase in heart rate when buzzed by drones. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

A juvenile California two-spot octopus (Octopus bimaculoides). Michael LaBarbera/Nature hide caption

itoggle caption Michael LaBarbera/Nature

Can you guess which eyes belong to what animal? Top row, from left: cuttlefish, lion, goat. Bottom row, from left: domestic cat, horse, gecko. Top row: iStockphoto; bottom row: Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Top row: iStockphoto; bottom row: Flickr

Ready, set, fly! The ball bearings glued to this bumblebee's legs simulate the weight and placement of pollen loads. The tag on the insect's back is a lightweight sensor, designed to track its movements in flight. Courtesy of Andrew Mountcastle hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Andrew Mountcastle

Life reconstruction of Wendiceratops pinhorn. Danielle Dufault/PLOS ONE hide caption

itoggle caption Danielle Dufault/PLOS ONE

Mammoths had a distinctive version of a gene known to play a role in sensing outside temperature, moderating the biology of fat and regulating hair growth. That bit of DNA likely helped mammoths thrive in cold weather, scientists say. Courtesy of Giant Screen Films, 2012 D3D Ice Age, LLC/Penn State University hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Giant Screen Films, 2012 D3D Ice Age, LLC/Penn State University

One of the 20 GPS sensors deployed on Greenland's Helheim Glacier to track its movement. Alistair Everett/Swansea University hide caption

itoggle caption Alistair Everett/Swansea University

An illustration of Pappochelys, based on its 240-million-year-old fossilized remains. This ancestor to today's turtle was about 8 inches long. Rainer Schoch/Nature hide caption

itoggle caption Rainer Schoch/Nature