Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.
Doby Photography /NPR
Nell Greenfieldboyce 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Nell Greenfieldboyce

Correspondent, Science Desk

Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.

With reporting focused on general science, NASA, and the intersection between technology and society, Greenfieldboyce has been on the science desk's technology beat since she joined NPR in 2005.

In that time Greenfieldboyce has reported on topics including the narwhals in Greenland, the ending of the space shuttle program, and the reasons why independent truckers don't want electronic tracking in their cabs.

Much of Greenfieldboyce's reporting reflects an interest in discovering how applied science and technology connects with people and culture. She has worked on stories spanning issues such as pet cloning, gene therapy, ballistics, and federal regulation of new technology.

Prior to NPR, Greenfieldboyce spent a decade working in print, mostly magazines including U.S. News & World Report and New Scientist.

A graduate of Johns Hopkins, earning her Bachelor's of Arts degree in social sciences and a Master's of Arts degree in science writing, Greenfieldboyce taught science writing for four years at the university. She was honored for her talents with the Evert Clark/Seth Payne Award for Young Science Journalists.

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Story Archive

The collision of two neutron stars, seen in an artist's rendering, created both gravitational waves and gamma rays. Researchers used those signals to locate the event with optical telescopes. Robin Dienel/Carnegie Institution for Science hide caption

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Robin Dienel/Carnegie Institution for Science

Astronomers Strike Gravitational Gold In Colliding Neutron Stars

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Adult female with young male coming in (without collar) to her kill. Mark Elbroch/Panthera/Science hide caption

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Mark Elbroch/Panthera/Science

Pumas Are Not Such Loners After All

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Light Pollution Can Impact Nocturnal Bird Migration

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Nobel Prize In Chemistry Awarded To Researchers Who Improved 'Imaging Of Biomolecules'

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Chemistry Nobel Prize Awarded For Advances In Cell Imaging

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Ken Catania of Vanderbilt University lets a small eel zap his arm as he holds a device he designed to measure the strength of the electric current. Ken Catania hide caption

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Ken Catania

It's Like An 'Electric-Fence Sensation,' Says Scientist Who Let An Eel Shock His Arm

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Experiments that showed how to make the H5N1 bird flu virus more contagious raised concern about malicious misuse of laboratory research. Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Getty Images

A partial solar eclipse (left) is seen from the Cotswolds, United Kingdom, while a total solar eclipse is seen from Longyearbyen, Norway, in March 2015. Tim Graham/Getty Images/Haakon Mosvold Larsen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Graham/Getty Images/Haakon Mosvold Larsen/AFP/Getty Images

Be Smart: A Partial Eclipse Can Fry Your Naked Eyes

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On Nov. 13, 2012, a narrow corridor in the southern hemisphere experienced a total solar eclipse. The corridor lay mostly over the ocean but also cut across the northern tip of Australia where both professional and amateur astronomers gathered to watch. Romeo Durscher/NASA Goddard Space Center/Flickr hide caption

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Romeo Durscher/NASA Goddard Space Center/Flickr

Why Future Earthlings Won't See Total Solar Eclipses

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Retired astrophysicist Fred Espenak (right) and his wife, Patricia, photographed a total solar eclipse from Jinta, China, on Aug. 1, 2008. He has witnessed 27 such events and plans to be in Casper, Wyo., on Aug. 21 — depending on the forecast. Courtesy of Fred Espenak hide caption

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Courtesy of Fred Espenak

Go See It, Eclipse Chasers Urge. 'Your First Time Is Always Special'

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A total solar eclipse is visible through the clouds as seen from Vagar in the Faroe Islands in March 2015. Eric Adams/AP hide caption

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Eric Adams/AP

Scientists Prepare For 'The Most Beautiful Thing You Can See In The Sky'

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