David Greene David Greene is Co-host of Morning Edition and Up First.

In rural North Dakota, where Melanie Hoffert grew up on her family farm, discussing subjects like homosexuality and same-sex marriage is often considered taboo. Courtesy of Beacon Press hide caption

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Courtesy of Beacon Press

A North Dakota Family Breaks The Silence On Gay Marriage

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Joel Heitkamp smiles while broadcasting in 2009 at AM radio station KFGO in Fargo, N.D. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Radio Connects North Dakota Residents Divided On Gay Rights

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NHL Aims To Include More Minority Players To Expand Fan Base

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The small town of Wahpeton, N.D., is one of the places where conversations on same-sex marriage are playing out in schools, churches and families. Maggie Penman/NPR hide caption

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Maggie Penman/NPR

What We Talk About When We Talk About Gay Marriage

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Yemen's Deteriorating Stability Makes It A Perfect Home For Al-Qaida

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Seattle Public Transportation Has Gone to The Dogs — Well, One Dog

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Kent Haruf, Author Of Moving, Colorado-Set Novels, Dies At 71

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George W. Bush's Book Reflects On Moscow, Ukraine's Revolution

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With Shift From Ukraine To Russia, Crimea's Business And Pleasure Uprooted

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Valentin Danilov, 83, is a former executive officer on a Soviet sub who proudly wears his old Soviet military uniform. Crimeans like Danilov have, without changing their residence, lived in three different countries in the past 25 years — the Soviet Union, then Ukraine and now Russia. Max Avdeev for NPR hide caption

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Max Avdeev for NPR

Crimean Tatar's History A Backdrop For Current Pressures

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Tatar Men Disappear In Crimea, And Families Fill With Dread

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Crimean Tatars Pressured To Become Russian Citizens

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Closed McDonald's In Moscow Taken As A Political Message

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Russia established the Crimean port of Sevastopol in the 18th century. After the Soviet breakup in 1991, Russia and Ukraine shared the naval base. But Russia has now taken the entire base, including Ukrainian ships. Max Avdeev for NPR hide caption

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In Crimea, Many Signs Of Russia, Few Of Resistance

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