Vegetable seller Olesya Vladymyrovna, 55, holds a pumpkin at a market in Lviv, Ukraine. For centuries in the Eastern European nation, a pumpkin meant: "No, I will not marry you." David Greene/NPR hide caption

toggle caption David Greene/NPR

Russian councilman Jean Gregoire Sagbo speaks in the administration office in Novozavidovo, a village 60 miles north of Moscow, on July 20. As the first black man elected to public office in Russian history, he has been nicknamed Russia’s Obama, something he’s not too pleased about. Sergey Ponomarev/AP hide caption

toggle caption Sergey Ponomarev/AP

Leonid Burmistrov, a researcher at the Vavilov Institute of Plant Industry, stands amid orange "sorbus" or "mountain ash." This fruit and others could be destroyed if the Russian government sells the land in the village of Pavlovsk. David Greene/NPR hide caption

toggle caption David Greene/NPR

Visitors walk through a room that contains works by early Italian painters at the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Estonia, which joined the European Union in 2004, will adopt the euro as its currency in January 2011. Matthias Rietschel/AP hide caption

toggle caption Matthias Rietschel/AP
Sergei Sotnikov/NPR

Police officers carry a detained opposition activist during a banned anti-Kremlin protest in Moscow on May 31. Opposition leaders say the new law, championed by the majority United Russia party led by Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, could be used to pressure activists into not organizing such protests. Ivan Sekretarev/AP hide caption

toggle caption Ivan Sekretarev/AP

NPR thanks our sponsors

Become an NPR sponsor