Civilians who had just recently arrived in Yola prepare to flee again, this time in a large open-top truck headed to the city of Jos. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

Ramatu Usman, shown here with one of her sons, is a 37-year-old mother of eight. She says she was separated from one of her sons, 6-year-old Yahaya Buba, following an attack. He is still missing. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

Lt. Col. Isaac Yacouba Zida, named by Burkina Faso's army as interim leader following the ousting of President Blaise Compaore, leaves after a meeting with diplomats on Sunday in the capital Ouagadougou. Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images

At the onset of symptoms, Dr. Adaora Igonoh (center) and her colleagues began drinking oral rehydration solution. It doesn't taste great but they say it helped them survive Ebola. They each downed over a gallon a day for nearly a week. Andrew Esiebo/Courtesy of WHO hide caption

itoggle caption Andrew Esiebo/Courtesy of WHO

Liberian physician Martha Zarway continues work in a temporary clinic while her original facility is disinfected. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Bendu Borlay, 21 and an Ebola survivor, is caring for an infant whose mother died of the disease. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Not every business has been hurt by the Ebola epidemic: Stephen Kollie says his newspaper stand is thriving because people are hungry for the latest Ebola information. But many of his usual expatriate customers have left the country, he says. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Tommy Trenchard for NPR