At the onset of symptoms, Dr. Adaora Igonoh (center) and her colleagues began drinking oral rehydration solution. It doesn't taste great but they say it helped them survive Ebola. They each downed over a gallon a day for nearly a week. Andrew Esiebo/Courtesy of WHO hide caption

itoggle caption Andrew Esiebo/Courtesy of WHO

Liberian physician Martha Zarway continues work in a temporary clinic while her original facility is disinfected. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Bendu Borlay, 21 and an Ebola survivor, is caring for an infant whose mother died of the disease. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Not every business has been hurt by the Ebola epidemic: Stephen Kollie says his newspaper stand is thriving because people are hungry for the latest Ebola information. But many of his usual expatriate customers have left the country, he says. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Alieu P. Manor, 18, survived Ebola. He gazes into the room of his cousin, Varlee Kanneh, who was not so lucky. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Morris Nyumah wanted to help his country fight Ebola, so he signed up to work as a hygienist at the Doctors Without Borders care center in Lofa County. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Eva Nah raised her nephew Shacki from the age of 2, when he lost his parents. "Every day [when] I wake up I cry because I feel bad that Shacki has left me," she says. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Information minister Lewis Brown is proud of Liberia's strong response to Ebola but admits, "We think sometimes we could have done better — much quicker — to improve the response time." Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Tommy Trenchard for NPR