Ofeibea Quist-Arcton
Jacques Coughlin/N/A

Ofeibea Quist-Arcton

International Correspondent, Dakar

Ofeibea Quist-Arcton is a journalist and broadcaster from Ghana who reports for NPR News on issues and developments related to West Africa. She spent her early years in Ghana, Italy, Britain and Kenya.

Quist-Arcton has lived and worked in the U.K., France, Ivory Coast, U.S., South Africa and most recently Senegal, traveling all over Africa as a journalist, broadcaster, commentator and host.

After completing high school in Britain, she took a degree in French studies with international relations and Spanish at the London School of Economics (LSE) and went on to study radio journalism at the Polytechnic of Central London, with two internships at the BBC.

Quist-Arcton joined the BBC in 1985, working at a number of regional radio stations all over Britain, moving two years later to the renowned BBC World Service at Bush House in London, as a producer and host in the African Service. She traveled and reported throughout Africa.

She spent the year leading up to 1990 in Paris, on a BBC journalist exchange with Radio France International (RFI), working in "Monito" — a service supplying reports and interviews about Africa to African radio stations, and with RFI's English (for Africa) Service as a host, reporter and editor.

Later in 1990, Quist-Arcton won one of the BBC's coveted foreign correspondents posts, moving to Abidjan, Ivory Coast, to head the corporation's West Africa bureau. From there, she covered 24 countries, straddling the Sahara to the heart of the continent — crisscrossing the continent from Mauritania, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Mali, to Zaire and Congo-Brazzaville, via Chad, Equatorial Guinea and Cameroon. She contributed to all BBC radio and television outlets, covering the flowering of democracy in the region, as well as the outbreak of civil wars, revolutions and coups, while always keeping an eye on the "other" stories about Africa that receive minimal media attention — including the continent's rich cultural heritage. Quist-Arcton also contributed to NPR programs during her reporting assignment in West and Central Africa.

After four years as BBC West Africa correspondent, she returned to Bush House in 1994, as a host and senior producer on the BBC World Service flagship programs, Newshour & Newsday (now The World Today), and as a contributing Africa specialist for other radio and TV output.

Quist-Arcton laced up her traveling shoes again in 1995 and relocated to Boston as a roving reporter for The World, a co-production between the BBC, Public Radio International (PRI) and WGBH. She lived in Cambridge and enjoyed getting to know Massachusetts and the rest of New England, learning a new language during winter, most of it related to snow!

For The World, she traveled around the United States, providing the program with an African journalist's perspective on North American life. She also spent six months as a roving Africa reporter, covering — among other events — the fall of President Mobutu Sese Seko in Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of Congo) in 1997.

In 1998, after another stint back at BBC World Service, Quist-Arcton was appointed co-host of the South African Broadcasting Corporation's flagship radio drive-time show, PM Live, based in Johannesburg.

In 2000, she left the BBC to join allAfrica.com (allAfricaGlobal Media) as Africa correspondent, covering the continent's top stories, in all domains, and developing new radio shows for webcast and syndication to radio stations around the continent.

After six years in South Africa, Quist-Arcton joined NPR in November 2004 at the newly-created post of West Africa Correspondent, moving back to her home region, with a new base in Senegal.

Her passions are African art and culture, music, literature, open-air markets, antiques - and learning. She loves to travel and enjoys cycling and photography.

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Linda Tsungirirai Masarira was sent to prison for 84 days for her public protests against the leader of Zimbabwe. Courtesy of Linda Tsungirirai Masarira hide caption

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Courtesy of Linda Tsungirirai Masarira

Young Widow With 5 Kids Turns To Activism To Challenge A President

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Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe Hints At Retirement

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Authoritarian Leaders In Africa Celebrate Trump Victory

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South Africa Withdraws From International Court; Others Follow

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A protester holds up a street sign with President Robert Mugabe name on it as Zimbabwe opposition supporters clash with police during a protest march for electoral reforms on August 26, 2016 in Harare. Riots erupted in Zimbabwe's capital Harare after police fired tear gas and beat protesters who responded by throwing stones in the latest of a string of tense demonstrations. Wilfred Kajese/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Can Hashtags And Pop-Up Protests Topple A Leader?

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Fortunate Nyakupinda earns a living by selling secondhand clothes from the back of her car. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

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A Woman Named Fortunate Doesn't See Good Fortune Ahead In Zimbabwe

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Nigeria Announces The Release Of Some Kidnapped Girls

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Months Of Protests Lead To Ethiopia Declaring A State Of Emergency

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Zimbabwe's riot police clash with protesters who oppose the introduction of bond notes by the country's Reserve Bank, in the capital, Harare, on Aug. 17. The bank says the notes will be equivalent to the U.S. dollar, which serves as the country's main currency. But the announcement has prompted many to withdraw their U.S. dollars from banks. Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP hide caption

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Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP

The U.S. Dollar Is Zimbabwe's Main Currency, And It's Disappearing Fast

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Ethiopia Declares State Of Emergency Amid Continuing Protests

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Fati Abubakar takes her camera and goes searching for bitsofborno — people who show how life goes on in the troubled northeast of Nigeria. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

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Who's The Woman With The Camera Chasing Smiles And Styles In Nigeria?

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Intense Unrest Follows Protests Against Zimbabwe's Longtime President

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Gabon Rocked By Deadly Protests After Opposition Alleges Election Fraud

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Jollof rice is the celebration dish of West Africa. At its basic, it includes rice, tomatoes, onions and chili peppers. But there are a zillion variations, depending on your country of origin, and the friendly rivalry can get intense over which version reigns supreme. Matthew Mead/AP hide caption

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Matthew Mead/AP

Jollof Rice: West Africans Dish It Up With A Hefty Serving Of Smack Talk

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