Though scientists have identified sleepwalking triggers, the condition is still a bit of a mystery. Victoria Alexandrova/iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption Victoria Alexandrova/iStockphoto.com

Researchers are using MRI scans to learn more about the brains of people with extraordinary memory. iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto.com

An elderly couple holds hands while walking along a Berlin street. A recent study showed that walking grows the region of the brain that archives memories. Patrick Sinkel/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Patrick Sinkel/AFP via Getty Images

In this video game image from Call of Duty: Black Ops, special forces agents pilot a gunship up the Mekong River. Scientists say immersion games like this one may develop certain parts of kids' brains. Activision via AP hide caption

itoggle caption Activision via AP

Hand-holding causes levels of the stress hormone cortisol to drop, says Matt Hertenstein, an experimental psychologist at DePauw University in Indiana. This couple joined hands while protesting offshore oil drilling in the wake of the Deepwater Horizon spill during a Hands Across the Sand event in Gulfport, Miss. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Gregory Bull/AP

New research finds that socializing kids to drink at the family table -- often referred to as the "European drinking model" -- doesn't necessarily translate to more responsible drinking patterns. Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images

Dr. Margaret Morris at Intel Corp. is designing a cell phone app to help manage stress in everyday life, in order to improve mental health and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Morris calls the app "Mobile Therapy." Courtesy of Dr. Margaret Morris hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Dr. Margaret Morris

Lifelong learning and brain stimulation can help increase memory and decision-making ability, according to neuroscientists. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

The red specks highlight where the integrity of the brain's white matter is significantly less in the teens who binge drink, compared to those who do not. Courtesy of Susan Tapert/Tim McQueeny/UCSD hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Susan Tapert/Tim McQueeny/UCSD