If you've noticed that kids seem to be better at figuring out these things, you're not alone. iStockphoto hide caption

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Preschoolers Outsmart College Students In Figuring Out Gadgets

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Humans make split-second judgments about others based on the way they talk. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

You Had Me At Hello: The Science Behind First Impressions

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Deep brain stimulation eased Shari Finsilver's tremors, but didn't stop them entirely. Here she uses both hands to stabilize a glass of water. Marvin Shaouni for NPR hide caption

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Marvin Shaouni for NPR

Involuntary Shaking Can Be Caused By Essential Tremors

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Why A Regular Bedtime Is Important For Children

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Lou Ann Schachner, 84, and Jay Schachner, 81, are volunteers with the Northwestern University SuperAging Project. They keep track of all their plans in a shared calendar. She loves to cook and study French and he is a part-time tax lawyer. Samantha Murphy for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Murphy for NPR

Inside The Brains Of People Over 80 With Exceptional Memory

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Though scientists have identified sleepwalking triggers, the condition is still a bit of a mystery. Victoria Alexandrova/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Lack Of Sleep, Genes Can Get Sleepwalkers Up And About

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Researchers are using MRI scans to learn more about the brains of people with extraordinary memory. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Why Can Some People Recall Every Day Of Their Lives? Brain Scans Offer Clues

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The Other Big Deficit: Many Teens Fall Short On Sleep

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An elderly couple holds hands while walking along a Berlin street. A recent study showed that walking grows the region of the brain that archives memories. Patrick Sinkel/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Aerobic Exercise May Improve Memory In Seniors

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In this video game image from Call of Duty: Black Ops, special forces agents pilot a gunship up the Mekong River. Scientists say immersion games like this one may develop certain parts of kids' brains. Activision via AP hide caption

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Activision via AP

Video Games Boost Brain Power, Multitasking Skills

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Hand-holding causes levels of the stress hormone cortisol to drop, says Matt Hertenstein, an experimental psychologist at DePauw University in Indiana. This couple joined hands while protesting offshore oil drilling in the wake of the Deepwater Horizon spill during a Hands Across the Sand event in Gulfport, Miss. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Human Connections Start With A Friendly Touch

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New research finds that socializing kids to drink at the family table -- often referred to as the "European drinking model" -- doesn't necessarily translate to more responsible drinking patterns. Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images hide caption

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With Drinking, Parent Rules Do Affect Teens' Choices

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Dr. Margaret Morris at Intel Corp. is designing a cell phone app to help manage stress in everyday life, in order to improve mental health and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Morris calls the app "Mobile Therapy." Courtesy of Dr. Margaret Morris hide caption

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Courtesy of Dr. Margaret Morris

Mental Health Apps: Like A 'Therapist In Your Pocket'

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Lifelong learning and brain stimulation can help increase memory and decision-making ability, according to neuroscientists. iStockphoto hide caption

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The Aging Brain Is Less Quick, But More Shrewd

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The red specks highlight where the integrity of the brain's white matter is significantly less in the teens who binge drink, compared to those who do not. Courtesy of Susan Tapert/Tim McQueeny/UCSD hide caption

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Courtesy of Susan Tapert/Tim McQueeny/UCSD

Teen Drinking May Cause Irreversible Brain Damage

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