Turns out that humans aren't the only animals that contagiously yawn. iStockphoto hide caption

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Yawning May Promote Social Bonding Even Between Dogs And Humans

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When The Brain Scrambles Names, It's Because You Love Them

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Why People Take Risks To Help Others: Altruism's Roots In The Brain

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Rob Donnelly for NPR

The Biology Of Altruism: Good Deeds May Be Rooted In The Brain

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Skimping On Sleep Can Stress Body And Brain

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If you've noticed that kids seem to be better at figuring out these things, you're not alone. iStockphoto hide caption

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Preschoolers Outsmart College Students In Figuring Out Gadgets

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Humans make split-second judgments about others based on the way they talk. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

You Had Me At Hello: The Science Behind First Impressions

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Deep brain stimulation eased Shari Finsilver's tremors, but didn't stop them entirely. Here she uses both hands to stabilize a glass of water. Marvin Shaouni for NPR hide caption

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Marvin Shaouni for NPR

Involuntary Shaking Can Be Caused By Essential Tremors

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Why A Regular Bedtime Is Important For Children

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Lou Ann Schachner, 84, and Jay Schachner, 81, are volunteers with the Northwestern University SuperAging Project. They keep track of all their plans in a shared calendar. She loves to cook and study French and he is a part-time tax lawyer. Samantha Murphy for NPR hide caption

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Samantha Murphy for NPR

Inside The Brains Of People Over 80 With Exceptional Memory

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Though scientists have identified sleepwalking triggers, the condition is still a bit of a mystery. Victoria Alexandrova/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Lack Of Sleep, Genes Can Get Sleepwalkers Up And About

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Researchers are using MRI scans to learn more about the brains of people with extraordinary memory. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Why Can Some People Recall Every Day Of Their Lives? Brain Scans Offer Clues

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The Other Big Deficit: Many Teens Fall Short On Sleep

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An elderly couple holds hands while walking along a Berlin street. A recent study showed that walking grows the region of the brain that archives memories. Patrick Sinkel/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Sinkel/AFP via Getty Images

Aerobic Exercise May Improve Memory In Seniors

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In this video game image from Call of Duty: Black Ops, special forces agents pilot a gunship up the Mekong River. Scientists say immersion games like this one may develop certain parts of kids' brains. Activision via AP hide caption

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Activision via AP

Video Games Boost Brain Power, Multitasking Skills

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