Robert Bonifas (left) and Don Parrish on the road in Khartoum, the capital of Sudan. The pair are members of a travel website where people compete to see the world. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Extreme Travelers Go The Distance For Destinations

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Will Focusing On Southern Sudan Prevent Genocide?

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At a staging area 20 miles south of Khartoum, a man carries his suitcase as he makes his way to a bus headed to Southern Sudan. A referendum in January could grant the south independence from Khartoum, but Southern Sudan is ill-equipped to provide for the tens of thousands of people are heading south ahead of the vote and promise of self-rule. Abd Raouf/AP hide caption

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Dreams Of Life In Southern Sudan Clash With Reality

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People stand in line at Juba University for hours to register to vote next month on independence for Southern Sudan. Here, a poll worker helps a prospective voter put a thumb print on his registration card. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Sudan Vote Could Make A New Nation, A War, Or Both

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A U.N. peacekeeper stands guard in Abyei last month. The Sudanese town on the faultline between north and south is slowly recovering from violence two years ago and is bracing for more bloodshed as a referendum looms on independence for Southern Sudan. Guillaume Lavalee/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Disputed Border Area Could Reignite War In Sudan

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Southern Sudan Voters Remember Long Civil War

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Southern Sudan Voters Mull Independence Bid

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The mayor of Nairobi, Geoffrey Majiwa (center), was in court Oct. 26 to face charges of fraud over the purchase of land to serve as a new cemetery for the Kenyan capital. Majiwa was arrested by the Kenya Anti-Corruption Commission. Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Will Kenya's Attempt To Root Out Graft Take Hold?

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The contrast between Mogadishu and the Somaliland capital of Hargeisa is striking. In Hargeisa, people wave at foreigners, but in Mogadishu, foreigners are more likely to be shot or kidnapped. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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In East Africa, A Bright Spot Amid The Anarchy

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Few Traces Of Past Glory In Mogadishu

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Eastleigh, an area in Nairobi, Kenya, is known as "Little Mogadishu." It's a Somali neighborhood of mud roads, open sewers and intrigue where the militant group al-Shabab is trying to recruit people to its efforts to create a strict Islamist state in Somalia. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Somalia's Al-Shabab Spreads Its Message In Kenya

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European soldiers are training 2,000 Somalis to help build a national army to defend a weak, Western-backed government in Mogadishu, Somalia. Here, a European soldier participates in the training of a Somali recruit at a training camp in remote Uganda. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Building An Army In Somalia, Teaching It To Fight

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African Union troops are trying to bring stability to war-ravaged Somalia. They are locked in battle with al-Shabab, Islamist militants who claim ties with al-Qaida. Here, militiamen in Mogadishu, Somalia's capital, ride in a "technical" -- a pickup truck outfitted with weapons. This militia supports the African Union and local government troops. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Peacekeepers, Islamists Battle For The Soul Of Somalia

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