Cattle herders lead cows and bulls down an unpaved road in Southern Sudan's main city Juba — soon to be the capital of the new country. Roberto Schmidt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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An armed Somali pirate keeps vigil along the coastline of Hobyo, a pirate lair on the Indian Ocean. Mohamed Dahir/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A fishing boat bobs in the waves along the Somaliland coast looking out on the Gulf of Aden, a favorite area for pirate attacks. Kabir Dhanji for NPR hide caption

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Other nations that catch Somali pirates are reluctant to send them back because the prisons do not meet international standards. This prison in the coastal city of Berbera, Somalia, dates to the 1880s, and inmates constantly complain about conditions. Kabir Dhanji for NPR hide caption

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Anti-government protesters demonstrate in front of the Saudi Embassy in Manama, Bahrain, on March 15. Frenzied clashes swept Bahrain a day after a Saudi-led military force entered the country to help defend the Sunni monarchy from a Shiite-led protest movement. Hasan Jamali/AP hide caption

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World

Bahraini Protesters Angry With United States

Some say they believe the White House tacitly approved the attacks on demonstrators last week — and put its strategic interests over democratic principles.

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A Bahraini nurse (right) walks with anti-government protesters heading onto the streets of Manama to await a Saudi-led military force that crossed into Bahrain on Monday. Hasan Jamali/AP hide caption

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Bahraini Shiite protesters march during an anti-regime demonstration in the capital, Manama, last week. Shiites make up the majority in Bahrain, but many say they're treated like second-class citizens in the Sunni-ruled country. Adam Jan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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