Finance Minister Yoshihiko Noda was chosen leader of the ruling Democratic Party of Japan on Monday. That all but ensures his selection as Japan's next prime minister. Hiro Komae/AP hide caption

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In Japan, Next Prime Minister Faces Many Skeptics
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Most of Kesennuma's large fishing boats either survived the tsunami or have been repaired. But many do not move from the dock, because most of the city's fish-processing factories still lie in ruins. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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After Quake, Japanese Fishing Port Remains At Risk
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Boston-based NGO All Hands is restoring water-damaged photos recovered from Japan's tsunami using scanners and a host of professional photo re-touchers around the world. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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In Japan, Restoring Photos For Tsunami Victims
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Japan Rethinks Its Relationship With The Atom
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Paper lanterns to commemorate the victims of the bombing of Hiroshima float in the Motoyasu River in front of the Atomic Bomb Dome, in Hiroshima, Japan, on Saturday. Toru Yamanaka/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nuclear Power Criticized On Hiroshima Anniversary
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Asian, European Markets Rattled By U.S. Losses
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Three Chinese companies are building a massive superhighway in Kenya linking Nairobi with the city of Thika. The road, as wide as 16 lanes, is the biggest of its kind in East Africa. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Will Kenyan Superhighway Also Benefit China?
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A radio-tracking collar worn by a tiang was cut off by hunters after the animal was shot. Conservationists track wildlife in South Sudan to help the government devise anti-poaching strategies after decades of devastating civil war. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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South Sudan Battles Poaching In Quest For Tourism
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Conservationists feared most of South Sudan's wildlife had been killed during more than two decades of civil war, but a survey several years ago found many had survived, including hundreds of thousands of white-eared kobs. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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South Sudan Works To Aid Wildlife That Survived War
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The Chinatown in Lagos, Nigeria, was built in 2004. It's home to more than 100 shops that sell everything from ceramic coffee cups to Hannah Montana backpacks. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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In Nigeria, Chinatown Vendors Struggle For Profits
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Cattle herders lead cows and bulls down an unpaved road in Southern Sudan's main city Juba — soon to be the capital of the new country. Roberto Schmidt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Cattle Rustling A Deadly Business In Sudan
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An armed Somali pirate keeps vigil along the coastline of Hobyo, a pirate lair on the Indian Ocean. Mohamed Dahir/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Inside The Pirate Business: From Booty To Bonuses
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A fishing boat bobs in the waves along the Somaliland coast looking out on the Gulf of Aden, a favorite area for pirate attacks. Kabir Dhanji for NPR hide caption

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Catching Pirates With A Kind Of Neighborhood Watch
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Other nations that catch Somali pirates are reluctant to send them back because the prisons do not meet international standards. This prison in the coastal city of Berbera, Somalia, dates to the 1880s, and inmates constantly complain about conditions. Kabir Dhanji for NPR hide caption

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Somaliland Struggles In Effort To Fight Piracy
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Anti-government protesters demonstrate in front of the Saudi Embassy in Manama, Bahrain, on March 15. Frenzied clashes swept Bahrain a day after a Saudi-led military force entered the country to help defend the Sunni monarchy from a Shiite-led protest movement. Hasan Jamali/AP hide caption

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Many Bahraini Protesters Angry With United States
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