Eight bridges have collapsed around China since 2011. Here, government investigators examine a recently built entrance ramp that collapsed last week in the northeastern city of Harbin, killing three people. Local residents believe government corruption and substandard materials are to blame. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Chinese Blame Failing Bridges On Corruption

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The "Loving Happiness Band," supported, in part, by the Communist Party, plays for a crowd on Nanjing Road. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Festive Nanjing Road Recaptures Shanghai's Heyday

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Bo Xilai's Wife Gets Suspended Death Sentence

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Chinese Court Hears Murder Case In One Day

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Gu Kailai, the wife of disgraced Chinese politician Bo Xilai, will stand trial on charges related to the murder of British businessman Neil Heywood. Here, the couple is shown in 2007 attending Bo's father's funeral. Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Murder Trial Of Chinese Politician's Wife Set To Start

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The central Chinese city of Wuhan has a population of 10 million people, more than New York City. Both Chinese and foreigners are flocking to Wuhan, the GDP of which is expected to double in five years. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Wu-Where? Opportunity Now In China's Inland Cities

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Slowed Growth Reflects China's Uphill Battle

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Feng Jianmei and her husband could not pay $6,000 in fines for violating China's one-child policy. In June, when she was seven months pregnant, local officials abducted her and forced her to have an abortion, her family says. The case has provoked widespread outrage. Quirky China News/Rex Features hide caption

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After A Forced Abortion, A Roaring Debate In China

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A Chinese worker operates a machine at a factory in Binzhou in northeast China's Shandong province. China's exports and imports shot up in May year-on-year, the customs agency said on June 10, defying expectations amid a slowdown in the world's second largest economy. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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China's Economy Cools, Perhaps More Than Planned

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The Philadelphia Orchestra, which declared bankruptcy last year, has been performing in China, where it is looking to develop new streams of revenue. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Bankrupt At Home, Philly Orchestra Looks To China

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For the past two months, the Philippines and China have been locked in a standoff over territory in the South China Sea that both countries claim.The Philippine navy accused Chinese boats of fishing illegally in the area. Protesters in the Philippines are shown here marching in Manila earlier this month. Pat Roque/AP hide caption

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China, Philippines Face Off Over Remote Islands

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Moviegoers watch a 3-D IMAX movie at a Beijing theater run by the Chinese company Wanda, which recently announced it was buying AMC movie theaters for $2.6 billion. The move is seen as part of a larger effort by the Chinese conglomerate to move into the U.S. market. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Hollywood Dreams Led Chinese Firm To Buy Into U.S.

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Workers brush cashmere goats in South Gobi on Bat-Erdene Badam's family farm. Cashmere wool, milk and meat are the main commodities for Mongolia's herders. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Old Ways Disappearing In The New Mongolia

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Tseren-ochir is a superintendent at Oyu Tolgoi mine who goes by the name "Augie" because it's easier for the foreigners he works with to pronounce. He is overseeing workers digging a nearly 5,000-foot-deep shaft down to reach the copper ore. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Mongolians Scramble For A Share Of Mining Wealth

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