During a candlelight vigil in Dharamsala, India, on Wednesday, Tibetan Buddhist monks hold pictures of Tibetans they say were shot by Chinese security forces earlier this week. Angus McDonald/AP hide caption

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Tibetan Areas Rocked By Protest, Chinese Crackdown
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People line up to buy train tickets at Changsha Railway Station in Changsha, in southern China's Hunan province on Dec. 28, 2011. Million of Chinese are expected to cramp onto China's train network in the coming weeks to return home for the Chinese lunar new year that starts on Jan. 23, 2012. AP hide caption

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Not-So-Happy New Year: Rail Website Woes In China
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China's Rich Consider Leaving Growing Nation
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In China, Apple Halts Sales Of New iPhone
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Doris Phua, chief executive of Da Vinci, answers questions during a press conference in Beijing in July, after CCTV accused it of selling fake furniture at high prices. Later, the company said it paid the CCTV reporter more than $150,000 through a public relations company to halt further stories. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In China, Curious Case Of Fraud Grows Stranger Still
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Trucks loaded with Chinese goods head across the Yalu Bridge and into North Korea one day after the memorial service for the late leader Kim Jong Il, at the Chinese North Korean border town of Dandong on December 30, 2011. Mark Ralston /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Desire For Stability Keeps China, N. Korea Allies
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About 100 recent homebuyers protested plunging real estate values at China Vanke, a Chinese real estate company, on Sunday in Shanghai. The protesters said they wore surgical masks to hide their identities. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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After Boom Years, Chinese Housing Market Looks Soft
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Cui Jinmin oversees an abandoned strip of unfinished highway in western China's Shaanxi province. Cui says the government stopped paying his workers in April and they went home in July. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Despite Growth, China Too Faces Debt Problems
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NFL Tries To Coax Chinese Into Liking Football
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Why Is China's Baby Care Industry Booming?
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Customers look at iPads at an Apple Store in Shanghai, China. Some goods made in China cost more there than they do abroad. Jing wei/Imaginechina via AP hide caption

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Made In China Doesn't Mean Cheap In China
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Outspoken Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei (shown inside his compound on the outskirts of Beijing) was detained by the government for nearly three months. Now, the government says he owes $2.4 million in taxes and fines. Supporters are sending him money, raising nearly $1 million so far. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Giving Defiantly: Chinese Help Artist Pay Tax Bill
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China Warily Eyes E.U. Bailout
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An elderly Chinese man and woman chat at a park in Shanghai. Hundreds of elderly Shanghai residents make their way to IKEA twice a week for an informal lonely hearts club. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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At IKEA In Shanghai, Do-It-Yourself Matchmaking
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Lujiazui, Shanghai's financial district, includes the world's third- and sixth-tallest buildings. The city's population is 23 million.

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Nations Grow Populations, And Face New Problems
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