A man sells surveillance cameras at the main electronics market in Tienhe district, Guangzhou, in southern China's Guangdong province, on Aug. 8. EPA /Landov hide caption

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In China, The Government Isn't The Only Spy Game In Town

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The use of security cameras such as these, looking out over Tiananmen Square in Beijing, is on the rise in China. Critics say the government is using them to discourage dissidents. Ed Jones /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In China, Beware: A Camera May Be Watching You

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China Investigates Foxconn For Bribery Allegations

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Editorial Ignites Freedom Of Press Debate In China

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Japan's economy has been struggling for two decades and faces some of the same problems the U.S. has. Here, a man in Tokyo passes an electronic board displaying falling global markets. Yuriko Nakao/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Japan's Economic Woes Offer Lessons To U.S.

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Japan's New Leader Promises Tough Line On China

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Shinzo Abe of Japan's Liberal Democratic Party marks the name of a parliamentary election winner at party headquarters in Tokyo on Sunday. Japan's conservative LDP stormed back to power Sunday after three years in opposition. Junji Kurokawa/AP hide caption

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Japanese Voters Return Conservatives To Power

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Japan Vote Could Set New Tone For Nation

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Supporters hold up posters of Japan's former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at a rally in Osaka on Thursday. Considered a nationalist hawk, Abe is expected to become prime minister for a second time after parliamentary elections Sunday. Buddhika Weerasinghe/Getty Images hide caption

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Nationalist Rhetoric High As Japanese Head To Polls

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An NPR reporter recently was allowed to watch legal proceedings at Hongkou District Court — a rare opportunity for a foreign correspondent in Shanghai. Courtesy of Hongkou District Court hide caption

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A Rare Visit Inside A Chinese Courtroom

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Before it disappeared from the Web: Here's how People's Daily Online packaged its coverage of the "news" that Kim Jong Un is 2012's sexiest man. People's Daily Online (frame grab of a page that has now been removed) hide caption

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Authorities in Hunan province sentenced Tang Hui to 18 months in a re-education-through-labor camp after she repeatedly complained about the way police investigated the case of her daughter's kidnapping and forced prostitution. An uproar on Weibo, China's answer to Twitter, pushed authorities to free Tang days later. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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How Ordinary Chinese Are Talking And Fighting Back

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Wang Heying, 64, supports the new Communist leaders, even if she can barely name them. She says government policies have led street lamps, bigger houses and a TV in every home. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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In Rural China, New Leaders Aren't Familiar Faces

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A 1967 poster declares, "Beloved Chairman Mao, we are loyal to you forever." Courtesy of the Shanghai Propaganda Poster Art Center hide caption

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The Art Of Chinese Propaganda

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Chen Guangcheng, a blind Chinese lawyer, made international headlines when he escaped house arrest in April. Now at New York University, he believes changes to China's legal system are inevitable. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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