A volunteer feeds one of the dogs rescued from slaughter last December in a stand-off between animal rights activists and dog-meat sellers in central China. Such rescues have been taking place with some regularity in China. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

Headed For The Butcher, Chinese Dogs Are Rescued

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China's top Communist leaders, including Mao Tse-tung and Deng Xiao-ping, edge out Tibetan deities before a horrified Tibetan monk. This refers to the government's mandate that a photo of the leaders be placed in Tibetan monasteries at a time when monks continue to light themselves on fire to protest Chinese rule. Courtesy Rebel Pepper hide caption

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Courtesy Rebel Pepper

Workers burned during an explosion at an Apple supplier factory in Shanghai are seen at a hospital where they are receiving continued treatment for their injuries. According to the factory, 24 workers were burned in the explosion. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

iPad Workers: Plant Inspected Hours Before Blast

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A Malaysian customs official examines elephant tusks at a port in Kalang. Malaysia has become an ivory transit hub, with African elephant tusks bound for China. Worldwide, authorities seized more than 5,000 smuggled tusks. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Looking For Elephant Ivory? Try China

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World Bank Cautions China About Looming Crisis

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New York Knicks star Jeremy Lin (shown here during first-half action against the Toronto Raptors on Tuesday) has taken the NBA by storm. Now, Chinese basketball fans are claiming the California native as their own. Peter J. Thompson/MCT /Landov hide caption

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Peter J. Thompson/MCT /Landov

American-Born 'Linderella' Is The Pride Of China

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Chuck Taylor All Stars are common on the streets of Shanghai. Xuan Zhihui, 62, a retiree from a state-owned factory, wears her daughter's hand-me-down sneakers, which are 15 years old. She says they're really comfortable. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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China Laces Up Its Chuck Taylors

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During a candlelight vigil in Dharamsala, India, on Wednesday, Tibetan Buddhist monks hold pictures of Tibetans they say were shot by Chinese security forces earlier this week. Angus McDonald/AP hide caption

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Tibetan Areas Rocked By Protest, Chinese Crackdown

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People line up to buy train tickets at Changsha Railway Station in Changsha, in southern China's Hunan province on Dec. 28, 2011. Million of Chinese are expected to cramp onto China's train network in the coming weeks to return home for the Chinese lunar new year that starts on Jan. 23, 2012. AP hide caption

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AP

Not-So-Happy New Year: Rail Website Woes In China

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China's Rich Consider Leaving Growing Nation

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In China, Apple Halts Sales Of New iPhone

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Doris Phua, chief executive of Da Vinci, answers questions during a press conference in Beijing in July, after CCTV accused it of selling fake furniture at high prices. Later, the company said it paid the CCTV reporter more than $150,000 through a public relations company to halt further stories. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

In China, Curious Case Of Fraud Grows Stranger Still

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Trucks loaded with Chinese goods head across the Yalu Bridge and into North Korea one day after the memorial service for the late leader Kim Jong Il, at the Chinese North Korean border town of Dandong on December 30, 2011. Mark Ralston /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston /AFP/Getty Images

Desire For Stability Keeps China, N. Korea Allies

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About 100 recent homebuyers protested plunging real estate values at China Vanke, a Chinese real estate company, on Sunday in Shanghai. The protesters said they wore surgical masks to hide their identities. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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After Boom Years, Chinese Housing Market Looks Soft

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Cui Jinmin oversees an abandoned strip of unfinished highway in western China's Shaanxi province. Cui says the government stopped paying his workers in April and they went home in July. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Despite Growth, China Too Faces Debt Problems

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