Jim Zarroli 2010 i
Doby Photography /NPR
Jim Zarroli 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Jim Zarroli

Reporter, Business, New York

Jim Zarroli is a business reporter for NPR News, based at NPR's New York bureau.

He covers economics and business news including fiscal policy, the Federal Reserve, the job market and taxes

Over the years, he's reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders and Ponzi schemers. He's been heavily involved in the coverage of the European debt crisis and the bank bailouts in the United States.

Prior to moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position he covered the United Nations during the first Gulf War. Zarroli added to NPR's coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings and the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center.

Before joining the NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

Zarroli graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

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Bayer Makes $62 Billion Play For Monsanto
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Three-time Masters winner Phil Mickelson, shown at the Honda Classic golf tournament last year, benefited from insider trading of Dean Foods stock, according to U.S. officials. He has not been charged. Luis M. Alvarez/AP hide caption

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Golfer Phil Mickelson Is Named In Insider Trading Case
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A poster outlining Trump's tax plan, titled "Tax Reform That Will Make America Great Again," hung behind him at a September news conference. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Reality Check: What Donald Trump Has Said About Taxes And The Wealthy
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One of Donald Trump's most famous deals involved an effort to acquire control of the Empire State Building in the 1990s. Freddie Scott/FlickrVision/Getty Images hide caption

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The Empire State Building And The Art Of Trump's Deal
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Jennifer Kaiser, a 44-year-old legal assistant from Indianapolis, says her yearly raises are eaten up by expenses. Jim Zarroli/NPR hide caption

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Politics In Real Life: What Wage Stagnation Looks Like For Many Americans
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An engine is assembled at a Cummins plant in Columbus, Ind., in 2007. The Fortune 500 company sells diesel engines around the world. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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As Factory Jobs Slip Away, Indiana Voters Have Trade On Their Minds
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The JPMorgan Chase headquarters is seen in New York. Sen. Bernie Sanders has said it and other major banks are too big and powerful. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Breaking Up The Banks May Be More Complicated Than It Seems
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A police officer stands outside the Mossack Fonseca law firm Tuesday as organized crime prosecutors raid the offices in Panama City. Arnulfo Franco/AP hide caption

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Want To Set Up A Shell Corporation To Hide Your Millions? No Problem
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A woman jogs in Oakland, Calif., last February. Healthier lifestyles may be a reason why poor people live longer in some cities than others. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Life Expectancy Study: It's Not Just What You Make, It's Where You Live
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