Doby Photography /NPR
Jim Zarroli 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Jim Zarroli

Reporter, Business, New York

Jim Zarroli is a business reporter for NPR News, based at NPR's New York bureau.

He covers economics and business news including fiscal policy, the Federal Reserve, the job market and taxes

Over the years, he's reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders and Ponzi schemers. He's been heavily involved in the coverage of the European debt crisis and the bank bailouts in the United States.

Prior to moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position he covered the United Nations during the first Gulf War. Zarroli added to NPR's coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings and the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center.

Before joining the NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

Zarroli graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

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President-elect Donald Trump promised to give up legal control of his companies at his Jan. 11th press conference. Next to him was a stack of documents he said would sever his business ties. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani was named a special adviser on cybersecurity by President-elect Donald Trump. This position is likely to benefit his business. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Unclear Role Of Trump's Special Advisers Has Some Concerned

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Trump's Picks For Special Advisers Present Potential Ethical Issues

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Jared Kushner and his wife, Ivanka Trump, have played key roles in Donald Trump's campaign, his transition team and his family businesses. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Trump Relatives' Potential White House Roles Could Test Anti-Nepotism Law

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President-elect Donald Trump is expected to hold a news conference on Jan. 11 to address conflicts of interest, though an adviser said the date might shift. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Prominent Trump Backers Sign Letter Pushing To End Conflicts Of Interest

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The recently opened Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., is just one of several businesses that could pose a conflict of interest for President-elect Donald Trump as he prepares to take office. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Ethics Expert: Trump's Efforts To Address Conflicts Are 'Baby Steps'

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A demonstrator appeared outside the Trump International Hotel in Las Vegas last September, during a protest by the Culinary Workers Union. John Locher/AP hide caption

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As President, Trump Will Appoint Labor Board That Regulates His Hotels

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President-elect Donald Trump attends a meeting at Mar-a-Lago, in Palm Beach, Fla., on Wednesday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Trump's Businesses Could Be Tripped Up By A 2012 Insider Trading Law

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Patrons are reflected in a mirror as they eat at Trump Tower Grille at Trump Tower in New York. A critical Vanity Fair review preceded criticism of the magazine by the president-elect on Twitter. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A member of the New York Police Department stands in front of Trump Tower to provide security to President-elect Donald Trump on Nov. 10, in New York. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump Tower's Newest Tenants Likely To Be The Secret Service

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President-elect Donald Trump, shown here at a rally in Iowa last week, cancelled a press conference where he was supposed to reveal how he will deal with conflicts of interest. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Since winning the election, Donald Trump has faced numerous questions about the conflicts of interest posed by his vast business interests. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Poll: Trump Needs To Choose Between Presidency And His Business

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