Jim Zarroli Jim Zarroli is a business reporter for NPR News, based at NPR's New York bureau.

Nick Ayers (from left), adviser to the vice president; Brad Parscale, President Trump's digital and data director; David Bossie, deputy campaign manager; and Katrina Pierson, who served on the campaign's communications team. Drew Angerer/Getty Images (2); Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AFP/Getty Images; Darren McCollester/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images (2); Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AFP/Getty Images; Darren McCollester/Getty Images

Pichai Sundararajan, known as Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google Inc. speaks during an event to introduce Google Pixel phone and other Google products on October 4, 2016 in San Francisco, Calif. Ramin Talaie/Getty Images hide caption

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Ramin Talaie/Getty Images

President Donald Trump signed an executive order on Friday that puts a freeze on immigration from seven countries: Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Yemen, Iraq and Sudan. Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images

Many groups are raising questions about President Trump's conflicts of interest, but do they have the "standing" to challenge him in court? Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Can Groups Sue Over Trump's Business Conflicts Even If They Weren't Harmed?

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After Inauguration Day, Conflicts Of Interest Continue To Plague Trump

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When interests such as the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., take money from foreign governments, it's a potential violation of the Constitution, according to the group that filed the lawsuit. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani was named a special adviser on cybersecurity by President-elect Donald Trump. This position is likely to benefit his business. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Unclear Role Of Trump's Special Advisers Has Some Concerned

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Trump's Picks For Special Advisers Present Potential Ethical Issues

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Jared Kushner and his wife, Ivanka Trump, have played key roles in Donald Trump's campaign, his transition team and his family businesses. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Trump Relatives' Potential White House Roles Could Test Anti-Nepotism Law

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President-elect Donald Trump is expected to hold a news conference on Jan. 11 to address conflicts of interest, though an adviser said the date might shift. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Prominent Trump Backers Sign Letter Pushing To End Conflicts Of Interest

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The recently opened Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., is just one of several businesses that could pose a conflict of interest for President-elect Donald Trump as he prepares to take office. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Ethics Expert: Trump's Efforts To Address Conflicts Are 'Baby Steps'

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A demonstrator appeared outside the Trump International Hotel in Las Vegas last September, during a protest by the Culinary Workers Union. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

As President, Trump Will Appoint Labor Board That Regulates His Hotels

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