Jim Zarroli 2010 i
Doby Photography /NPR
Jim Zarroli 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Jim Zarroli

Reporter, Business, New York

Jim Zarroli is a business reporter for NPR News, based at NPR's New York bureau.

He covers economics and business news including fiscal policy, the Federal Reserve, the job market and taxes

Over the years, he's reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders and Ponzi schemers. He's been heavily involved in the coverage of the European debt crisis and the bank bailouts in the United States.

Prior to moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position he covered the United Nations during the first Gulf War. Zarroli added to NPR's coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings and the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center.

Before joining the NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

Zarroli graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

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Bernie Sanders told supporters after winning the New Hampshire primary, "The American people bailed out Wall Street; now it's Wall Street's time to help the middle class." J. David Ake/AP hide caption

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Pedestrians stand outside a securities firm in Tokyo Tuesday. Stocks plunged again in Japan, and the interest rate on the benchmark bond fell below zero. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

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The Two-Way

Japan Is Selling Bonds Guaranteed To Lose You Money

With the global economy in turmoil, interest rates on some government debt are falling below zero.

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Beyonce performs onstage in 2013 at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. Rob Hoffman/Invision for Parkwood Entertainment hide caption

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The Iranian private airline Mahan Air uses Airbus planes, like the one pictured here at Yemen's Sanaa airport in 2015. Tehran is in talks with Airbus to buy more than 100 additional passenger planes. Hani Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Trader Michael Capolino (right) watches prices on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange Wednesday. Stocks endured another bloodbath, and oil fell below $27 a barrel. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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The Two-Way

Wall Street Has Another Brutal Day, As Stock Prices Plummet

Fears about slowing global growth have sent the Dow Jones industrial average down by about 10 percent this month since the start of the year.

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Goldman CEO Lloyd Blankfein, shown here at a September 2014 panel discussion, says he is pleased to resolve the allegations against the firm. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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