Doby Photography /NPR
Jim Zarroli 2010
Doby Photography /NPR

Jim Zarroli

Reporter, Business, New York

Jim Zarroli is a business reporter for NPR News, based at NPR's New York bureau.

He covers economics and business news including fiscal policy, the Federal Reserve, the job market and taxes

Over the years, he's reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders and Ponzi schemers. He's been heavily involved in the coverage of the European debt crisis and the bank bailouts in the United States.

Prior to moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position he covered the United Nations during the first Gulf War. Zarroli added to NPR's coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings and the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center.

Before joining the NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

Zarroli graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

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The government ethics office says it has reason to believe disciplinary action is warranted against senior Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway for inappropriate comments on TV. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Conway Should Be Investigated For Plugging Ivanka Trump Products, Ethics Agency Says

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Trump's Presidency Takes Toll On His Daughter's Brand

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The Week Of Blurred Lines Between President Trump And Businessman Trump

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A worker cleaned the windows of the Ivanka Trump Collection in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York last month. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Kellyanne Conway Tells Americans To Buy Ivanka Trump's Products

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A floor of office space in Trump Tower, where President Trump lives with his family in a penthouse apartment, can rent for as much as $1.5 million a year. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

Pentagon's Interest In Leasing Trump Tower Space Presents Conflict

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President Trump arrives to watch the Super Bowl at Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach, Fla., on Sunday. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Trump's Role As President May Be Boosting His Brand's Reputation

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Donald Trump's presidential campaign spent $435,000 for facility rental, catering and lodging at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Fla., according to Politico. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Nick Ayers (from left), adviser to the vice president; Brad Parscale, President Trump's digital and data director; David Bossie, deputy campaign manager; and Katrina Pierson, who served on the campaign's communications team. Drew Angerer/Getty Images (2); Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AFP/Getty Images; Darren McCollester/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images (2); Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AFP/Getty Images; Darren McCollester/Getty Images

Pichai Sundararajan, known as Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google Inc. speaks during an event to introduce Google Pixel phone and other Google products on October 4, 2016 in San Francisco, Calif. Ramin Talaie/Getty Images hide caption

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Ramin Talaie/Getty Images

President Donald Trump signed an executive order on Friday that puts a freeze on immigration from seven countries: Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Yemen, Iraq and Sudan. Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images

Many groups are raising questions about President Trump's conflicts of interest, but do they have the "standing" to challenge him in court? Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Can Groups Sue Over Trump's Business Conflicts Even If They Weren't Harmed?

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After Inauguration Day, Conflicts Of Interest Continue To Plague Trump

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When interests such as the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., take money from foreign governments, it's a potential violation of the Constitution, according to the group that filed the lawsuit. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP