Asma Khalid Asma Khalid is a campaign reporter focusing on the intersection of demographics and politics in the 2016 election.

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Charles Camiel looks into the camera for a facial recognition test before boarding his JetBlue flight to Aruba at Logan International Airport in Boston. Robin Lubbock/WBUR hide caption

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Robin Lubbock/WBUR

Facial Recognition May Boost Airport Security But Raises Privacy Worries

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Online sales are growing by about 15 percent each year, but states say they're not getting their fair share of taxes from e-commerce. razerbird/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Massachusetts Tries Something New To Claim Taxes From Online Sales

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Paulo Melo is a global entrepreneur-in-residence at the University of Massachusetts-Boston. This visa workaround allowed Melo, originally from Portugal, to legally stay in the United States and build his business in Massachusetts. Asma Khalid/Asma Khalid/WBUR hide caption

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Asma Khalid/Asma Khalid/WBUR

Without A Special Visa, Foreign Startup Founders Turn To A Workaround

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Henry Tsai (front) and Yasyf Mohamedali created Hi From The Other Side, a website that connects people with opposing political views online and then gets them to meet in real life. Asma Khalid/WBUR hide caption

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Asma Khalid/WBUR

Tech Creates Our Political Echo Chambers. It Might Also Be A Solution

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Tim Berners-Lee still largely sees the potential of the Web, but it has not turned out to be the complete cyber Utopian dream he had hoped. Philippe Desmazes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Desmazes/AFP/Getty Images

H-1B Visa Debate: Are Foreign Tech Workers Hired Over Americans?

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The empty stage for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton on election night at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Democrats Try To Find A Future Post-Obama With Fault Lines Along Economics, Race

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First Family Watches Inaugural Parade Along Pennsylvania Avenue

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President Trump Leads Inaugural Parade Down Pennsylvania Avenue

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Latino voters go to the polls for early voting at the Miami-Dade Government Center on October 21, 2004 in Miami, Florida. A key constituency in Florida, many wondered how conservative Latinos would vote after now President-elect Trump's remarks on immigration. Gaston De Cardenas/Getty Images hide caption

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Gaston De Cardenas/Getty Images

Latinos Will Never Vote For A Republican, And Other Myths About Hispanics From 2016

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NPR reporter Asma Khalid during a live broadcast. She covered demographics and the 2016 campaign. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Reporter's Notebook: What It Was Like As A Muslim To Cover The Election

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Vendors congregated outside a rally for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at the Indiana Theater on May 1, 2016 in Terre Haute, Indiana. Charles Ledford/Getty Images hide caption

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Charles Ledford/Getty Images

This Bellwether Has Picked The Winning Presidential Candidate Since The 1890s

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Young supporters cheer as they wait for President Obama at his election night party in 2012 in Chicago. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Millennials Just Didn't Love Hillary Clinton The Way They Loved Barack Obama

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