Felix Contreras.

Felix Contreras. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

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Felix Contreras

Co-host, Alt.Latino

Felix Contreras is co-host of Alt.Latino, NPR's web-based program about Latin Alternative music and Latino culture. It features music as well as interviews with many of the most well-known Latino musicians, actors, film makers and writers.

Previously, Contreras was a producer and reporter for NPR's Arts Desk and covered, among other stories and projects: a series reported from Mexico introducing the then-new musical movement called Latin Alternative; a series of stories on the financial challenges facing aging jazz musicians; and helped produce NPR's award winning series 50 Great Voices.

He once stood on the stage of the legendary jazz club The Village Vanguard after interviewing the club's owner and swears he felt the spirits of Coltrane and Monk walking through the room.

Contreras is a recovering television journalist who has worked for both NBC and Univision. He's also a part-time musician who plays Afro-Cuban percussion with various jazz and Latin bands.

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DJ Tribilin Sound serves up bass, beeps and bloops from the Peruvian underground. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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In the fall of 1972, Yes' tour took the band from Canada to North Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee and New York. Roger Dean/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Chris Washburne and his band superimposes Duke Ellington's "Heaven" over Led Zeppelin's "Stairway To Heaven." Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Songs We Love

Chris Washburne And The SYOTOS Band, 'Stairway To Heaven'

This clever medley superimposes one of Duke Ellington's sacred works over a Led Zeppelin classic.

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Buraka Som Sistema was among the many Latin artists who impressed at this year's SXSW. Goncalo F. Santos/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Clark Terry wasn't just a trumpeter with flawless technique; he was also, according to one peer, a "natural-born educator" who devoted much of his later career to passing on his immense musical knowledge. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Santería ceremonies traditionally make use of hourglass-shaped batá drums. Eric Pancer/Flickr Creative Commons hide caption

itoggle caption Eric Pancer/Flickr Creative Commons