Jane Greenhalgh Jane Greenhalgh is a senior producer on NPR's Science Desk.

Jane Greenhalgh

Senior Producer, Science Desk

Jane Greenhalgh is a senior producer on NPR's Science Desk.

She produces the weekly "Your Health" segment on NPR's Morning Edition and on NPR's health blog "Shots." Greenhalgh also produces stories on science, health, and global health across NPR's many platforms. She was part of the team of broadcast, digital, and multimedia journalists who produced the 2015 award-winning series #15Girls, which examined the struggles teenage girls face throughout the developing world. Greenhalgh's story, Banished to the Shed, was one of NPR's most listened to and viewed stories of 2015.

Greenhalgh has twice won the National Academies of Science Communication award—the highest honor in science journalism—for her work on NPR's 2014 series, The human microbiome: guts and glory, and the 2009 series, Climate Connections. She traveled extensively for this year-long, multiplatform project examining how climate change is affecting people across the globe. From Timbuktu, where the desert nomads are giving up their way of life, to Peru, where potato farmers are moving their crops higher up the mountain, and to Bangladesh, where scientists are experimenting with drought and flood resistant rice, the stories Greenhalgh produced chronicled the impact of climate change.

Jane has also traveled extensively covering health issues in developing countries, including cholera in Haiti, polio in Indonesia, tuberculosis in Kenya, AIDS in India, malaria in the Gambia, malnutrition in Bolivia, and menstrual health in Nepal.

Before joining the Science Desk in 1995, Greenhalgh was the Senior Producer of NPR's All Things Considered on the weekends, overseeing the show during the first Persian Gulf War, the siege of Sarajevo, the release of Nelson Mandela, the fall of the Berlin wall, and other major news events. She started her career at NPR in 1990 as the Associate Producer and Director of All Things Considered on the weekends, and served as overnight editor on Morning Edition. Previously, Jane was a reporter at Florida Public Radio in Tallahassee and worked as an assistant producer at BBC Radio Scotland and BBC Radio Humberside.

Greenhalgh has an MA in Journalism from the University of Florida. She is a native of Great Britain and now lives in Oregon.

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Story Archive

Girls are much less likely to be diagnosed with autism, but that may be because the signs of the disorder can be less obvious than in boys. And girls may be missing out on help as a result. Sara Wong for NPR hide caption

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Sara Wong for NPR

'Social Camouflage' May Lead To Underdiagnosis Of Autism In Girls

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Turns out that humans aren't the only animals that contagiously yawn. iStockphoto hide caption

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Yawning May Promote Social Bonding Even Between Dogs And Humans

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

Is It Time For Hearing Aids To Be Sold Over The Counter?

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Tucker Lane and his mother, Lynn Cash, sit in the wooded backyard of his home in West Barnstable, Mass. Kayana Szymczak for NPR hide caption

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Kayana Szymczak for NPR

Beyond Lyme: New Tick-Borne Diseases On The Rise In U.S.

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Forbidding Forecast For Lyme Disease In The Northeast

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Pig farm workers push live pigs into a large grave in Nipah in 1999. To stop the outbreak, the Malaysian government culled almost 1 million pigs, nearly destroying the country's pork industry. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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A Taste For Pork Helped A Deadly Virus Jump To Humans

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Each year thousands of people from around the world tour the Gomantong Cave in Borneo. Although scientists have found a potentially dangerous virus in bats that roost in the cave, no one has ever gotten sick from a trip here. Razis Nasri hide caption

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Razis Nasri

The Next Pandemic Could Be Dripping On Your Head

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Once called the "Dutchmen" because of their large noses and large bellies, proboscis monkeys live only in Borneo. Ecosystems that have a lot of diverse animals, like this monkey, also tend to have a lot of diverse viruses. Charles Ryan hide caption

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Charles Ryan

Why Killer Viruses Are On The Rise

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Researchers have found marijuana metabolites in the urine of babies who were exposed to adult marijuana use. deux/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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Doctors Say Parents Shouldn't Smoke Pot Around Kids

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Kamala B.K. in front of her menstruation shed. Cecile Shrestha/WaterAid hide caption

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A Girl Gets Her Period And Is Banished To The Shed: #15Girls

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The Start Of School Is Not The Only Risky Time For Campus Rape

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Commuters headed to Oregon Health and Science University use cars, bikes and streetcars to connect with Portland's aerial tram, which whisks them up and over south waterfront neighborhoods. David P. Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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How To Solve A Sky-High Commuting Conundrum

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Yvonne Condes helps her son Alec get ready for baseball practice. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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In Many Families, Exercise Is By Appointment Only

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