Alison Kodjak Alison Fitzgerald Kodjak is a health policy correspondent on NPR's Science Desk.
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Alison Kodjak 2016
Noel St. John/NPR

Alison Kodjak

Health Policy Correspondent, Science Desk

Alison Fitzgerald Kodjak is a health policy correspondent on NPR's Science Desk.

Her work focuses on the business and politics of health care and how those forces flow through to the general public. Her stories about drug prices, limits on insurance and changes in Medicare and Medicaid appear on NPR's shows and in the Shots blog.

She joined NPR in September 2015 after a nearly two-decade career in print journalism, where she won several awards—including three George Polk Awards—as an economics, finance, and investigative reporter.

She spent two years at the Center for Public Integrity, leading projects in financial, telecom, and political reporting. Her first project at the Center, "After the Meltdown," was honored with the 2014 Polk Award for business reporting and the Society of Professional Journalists Sigma Delta Chi award.

Her work as both reporter and editor on the foreclosure crisis in Florida, on Warren Buffet's predatory mobile home businesses, and on the telecom industry were honored by several journalism organizations. She was part of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists team that won the 2015 Polk Award for revealing offshore banking practices.

Prior to joining the Center, Alison spent more than a decade at Bloomberg News, where she wrote about the convergence of politics, government, and economics. She interviewed chairmen of the Federal Reserve and traveled the world with two U.S. Treasury secretaries.

And as part of Bloomberg's investigative team she wrote about the bankruptcy of General Motors Corp. and the 2010 Gulf Oil Spill. She was part of a team at Bloomberg that successfully sued the Federal Reserve to release records of the 2008 bank bailouts, an effort that was honored with the 2009 George Polk Award. Her work on the international food price crisis in 2008 won her the Overseas Press Club's Malcolm Forbes Award.

Fitzgerald Kodjak and co-author Stanley Reed are authors of In Too Deep: BP and the Drilling Race that Took It Down, published in 2011 by John Wiley & Sons.

She's a graduate of Georgetown University and Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

She raises children and chickens in suburban Maryland.

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Story Archive

A California jury awarded a woman $417 million in a case against Johnson & Johnson. The woman claimed that her use of Johnson's Baby Powder led to terminal ovarian cancer. Scientists disagree on how strong a link there is between talc and ovarian cancer. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Does Baby Powder Cause Cancer? A Jury Says Yes. Scientists Aren't So Sure

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An analysis by the Congressional Budget Office released Tuesday found that ending cost-sharing reduction payments to insurers, a move that President Trump is contemplating, would raise the deficit by $194 billion over 10 years. Melina Mara/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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CBO Predicts Rise In Deficit If Trump Cuts Payments To Insurance Companies

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President Trump at a listening session with health insurance executives at the White House earlier this year. Aude Guerrucci/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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At his golf club in Bedminster, N.J., on Thursday President Trump called the opioid epidemic a national emergency and said his administration was drawing up papers to make it official. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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What Could Happen If Trump Formally Declares Opioids A National Emergency

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Andrew Ladd and Fumiko Chino at their wedding in 2006, after his cancer diagnosis. Ladd died the following year, leaving behind hundreds of thousands of dollars in medical debt. Courtesy of Dr. Fumiko Chino hide caption

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Courtesy of Dr. Fumiko Chino

Widowed Early, A Cancer Doctor Writes About The Harm Of Medical Debt

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First responders in Washington, D.C., bring naloxone on every emergency call. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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First Responders Spending More On Overdose Reversal Drug

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Trump's Threat To Cut U.S. Payments Raises Uncertainty In Health Insurance Market

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President Trump still hopes to force legislators back to the table to find a way to get rid of the Affordable Care Act, by any means possible. Tasos Katopodis /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tymia McCullough is a poised, pageant-winning 11-year-old from South Carolina. She also happens to have sickle cell anemia and relies on Medicaid to pay for medical care. Liam James Doyle/NPR hide caption

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Her Own Medical Future At Stake, A Child Storms Capitol Hill

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After Demise Of GOP Health Care Bill, Insurance Companies Wonder What's Next

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Death Knell Sounds For Senate's GOP Health Care Bill

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