Burning Bridge personnel, left to right: Jason Kao Hwang (violin), Wang Guowei (erhu), Sun Li (pipa), Ken Filiano (string bass), Andrew Drury (drum set), Joseph Daley (tuba), Steve Swell (trombone), Taylor Ho Bynum (cornet/flugelhorn). Scott Friedlander/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Music Reviews

Jason Kao Hwang: From The Blues To China And Back

The violinist attempts to mix jazz, classical and traditional Chinese music with his octet on Burning Bridge.

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Bessie Smith, "The Empress of the Blues," gave voice the listeners' tribulations and yearnings of the 1920s and '30s. Bettmann/Corbis hide caption

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Sam Rivers' trio with Dave Holland and Barry Altschul (not pictured) recently released its 2007 reunion show on CD. Ken Weiss/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Saxophonist Art Pepper called George Cables his favorite pianist. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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For Ron Miles, the better he knows how a tune works, the less he has to play to put it across. John Spiral hide caption

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Music Reviews

Ron Miles Finds Wide-Open Spaces On 'Quiver'

For Miles, the better he knows how a tune works, the less he has to play to put it across.

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Sam Rivers' trio with Dave Holland and Barry Altschul (not pictured) recently released its 2007 reunion show on CD. Ken Weiss/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Vince Guaraldi had range, as well as an instrumental hit right when jazz was vanishing from AM radio. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Music Articles

Vince Guaraldi Didn't Just Play For 'Peanuts'

Guaraldi had range, as well as an instrumental hit right when jazz was vanishing from AM radio.

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Brad Mehldau's latest covers project, Where Do You Start, came out Tuesday. Michael Wilson /Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Miguel Zenon. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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A new box set of early albums captures Jan Garbarek's forming saxophone sound — austere and astringent. Roberto Massoti/ECM Records hide caption

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Ryan Truesdell has turned unheard Gil Evans scores into richly textured works on Centennial: Newly Discovered Works of Gil Evans. Dina Regine hide caption

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Music Reviews

Digging Up The 'Newly Discovered Works Of Gil Evans'

Scholar and fan Ryan Truesdell has turned unheard Evans scores into richly textured works.

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Saxophonist Jesse Davis performs at Smalls Jazz Club in New York. Michelle Watt/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Ravi Coltrane's new album is called Spirit Fiction. Deborah Feingold/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Linda Oh Vincent Soyez/courtesy of the artist hide caption

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It's tricky making a little band sound big on Sweet Chicago Suite, but trombonist Ray Anderson knows his tricks. Jeanne Moutoussamy Ashe hide caption

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Music Articles

Ray Anderson: A Pocket-Size Suite Makes A Huge Racket

It's tricky making a little band sound this big, but trombonist Ray Anderson knows his tricks.

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