Tasneem Raja

Senior Digital Editor, Code Switch

Tasneem Raja is a Senior Digital Editor for NPR's Code Switch, where she works with the team to tell deeply important, messy, urgent stories about how race and identity collide with everything else in our lives—whether we realize it or not. In this role, Raja is an editor of the upcoming Code Switch podcast, as well as editor of long-form essays on race, culture, and identity for Code Switch online.

Before coming to NPR in 2015, Raja was the editor of an award-winning interactive team of digital reporters and producers at Mother Jones. She also worked with Mother Jones's senior editorial staff in crafting overall digital strategy and learning from traffic analytics and audience engagement metrics. She created a popular company-wide skills-sharing series, led an overhaul of digital storytelling workflows across the newsroom, and served as a desk editor during major breaking news events.

As an editor and reporter, Raja has a deep interest and background in issues of identity and inclusion. Her 7,000-word magazine feature on diversity in computer science has been called the definitive take on the subject. Her 2012 story on "brogrammer" culture in Silicon Valley broke open the conversation on tech's gender problem. And, Fast Company has called her "one of the smartest people on Twitter" for her commentary on issues of diversity and identity.

Raja was on the launch team of the investigative journalism startup The Bay Citizen, which partnered with The New York Times to bring fresh local reporting to the Bay Area. Before diving into digital news, Raja was a features reporter at the Chicago Reader, where she reported on subcultures and secret history all over the city.

Raja received her bachelor's degree in English from Bryn Mawr College. She is also a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism, where she was a pioneering student in the school's nascent multimedia program. She has also served as a judge for several journalism awards, including the Online News Association.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Critics are taking aim at the coalition of Americans pushing "to rethink essentially everything about the way we treat each other." Brooks Kraft/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brooks Kraft/Corbis via Getty Images

Actor Hank Azaria was once asked how the Simpsons writers created one of his most famous characters: Apu. "Right away they were like, 'Can you do an Indian accent and how offensive can you make it?'" Sylvar/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Sylvar/Flickr

What's So Funny About The Indian Accent? Episode 15

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/492073698/492077285" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Photo Illustration by Ruby Wallau/NPR

Comics Maz Jobrani and Aparna Nancherla On Their 'Difficult' Names: Episode 12

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/489451158/489453141" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
David Eads, Juan Elosua, Alyson Hurt and Brittany Mayes/NPR

Semi-Automatic Weapons Without A Background Check Can Be Just A Click Away

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/482483537/482521439" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A reconstruction of Kennewick Man sculpted to resemble the Ainu people of Japan, considered by some at the time to be his closest living relatives. Now, a link to Native Americans has been confirmed. Brittney Tatchell/Smithsonian Institute hide caption

toggle caption
Brittney Tatchell/Smithsonian Institute

Oh, weird, a street scene in Mumbai where everything isn't covered in neon clouds of dust. Is this really even India? Subhendu Sarkar/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Subhendu Sarkar/LightRocket via Getty Images

Dear White Artists Making Music Videos In India: Step Away From The 'Holi' Powder

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/465163237/465321707" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript