Leah Donnella Leah Donnella is a news assistant on NPR's Code Switch team.
Caitlin Sanders/NPR
Leah Donnella 2016
Caitlin Sanders/NPR

Leah Donnella

News Assistant, Code Switch

Leah Donnella is a news assistant on NPR's Code Switch team, where she primarily blogs and assists with the Code Switch podcast production.

Donnella originally came to NPR in September 2015 as an intern for Code Switch. Prior to that, she was a summer intern at WHYY's Public Media Commons, where she helped teach high school students the ins and outs of journalism and film-making. She spent a lot of time out in the hot Philly sun tracking down unsuspecting tourists for man-on-the-street interviews. Donnella also worked at the University of Pennsylvania for two years as the House Coordinator at Gregory College House, which is the University of Pennsylvania's language and cinema-themed dorm.

Donnella graduated from Pomona College with a Bachelor of Arts in Africana Studies.

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Code Switch is tackling your trickiest questions about race relations. amathers/iStock hide caption

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How To Talk Race With Your Family: Ask Code Switch

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Neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other demonstrators encircle counterprotesters at the base of a statue of Thomas Jefferson on the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville, Va., on Friday. NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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When 'Where Are You From?' Takes You Someplace Unexpected

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The Code Switch podcast is celebrating its first anniversary. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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From Mourning to 'Moonlight': A Year In Race, As Told By Code Switch

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Demonstrators hold up a Pan-African flag to protest the killing of teenager Michael Brown on Aug. 12, 2014 in Ferguson, Mo. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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On Flag Day, Remembering The Red, Black And Green

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"Racial impostor syndrome" is definitely a thing for many people. We hear from biracial and multi-ethnic listeners who connect with feeling "fake" or inauthentic in some part of their racial or ethnic heritage. Kristen Uroda for NPR hide caption

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'Racial Impostor Syndrome': Here Are Your Stories

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Actor Daniel Dae Kim attends a cocktail party celebrating dynamic and diverse nominees for the 67th Emmy Awards hosted by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences and SAG-AFTRA at Montage Beverly Hills on Aug. 27, 2015, in Beverly Hills, Calif. Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images hide caption

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Yara Shahidi has to navigate complex racial issues both inside and outside the world of Black-ish. Rich Fury/Getty Images hide caption

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Listen to this week's podcast episode

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'The Handmaid's Tale' Is Among A Resurgence Of Dystopian Literature

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U.S. artist Ryan Mendoza poses for a photo next to the former house of Afro-American human rights figure Rosa Parks on Mendoza's property on April 6, 2017 in Berlin, Germany. Mendoza bought the house, which was slated for demolition in Detroit, took it apart, shipped it to Germany, and put it back together again on the property next to his studio. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Throughout his career, Prince played around with constructions of race, gender and sexuality. Rico D'Rozario/Redferns via Getty Images hide caption

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Prince Contained Multitudes, New Book Confirms

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