Lucian Kim Lucian Kim is an international correspondent based in Moscow, Russia.

Lucian Kim

International Correspondent, Moscow, Russia

Lucian Kim is NPR's international correspondent based in Moscow. He has been reporting on Europe and the former Soviet Union for the past two decades.

Before joining NPR in 2016, Kim was based in Berlin, where he was a regular contributor to Slate and Reuters. As one of the first foreign correspondents in Crimea when Russian troops arrived, Kim covered the 2014 Ukraine conflict for news organizations such as BuzzFeed and Newsweek.

Kim first moved to Moscow in 2003, becoming the business editor and a columnist for the Moscow Times. He later covered energy giant Gazprom and the Russian government for Bloomberg News. When anti-government protests broke out in Moscow in 2011, he started a blog. In the following years he blogged about his travels to Chechnya and to Sochi, site of the 2014 Olympics.

Kim started his career in 1996 after receiving a Fulbright grant for young journalists in Berlin. There he worked as a correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor and the Boston Globe, reporting from central Europe, the Balkans, Afghanistan, and North Korea.

He has twice been the alternate for the Council on Foreign Relations Edward R. Murrow Fellowship.

Kim was born and raised in Charleston, Illinois. He earned a bachelor's degree in geography and foreign languages from Clark University, studied journalism at the University of California at Berkeley, and graduated with a master's degree in nationalism studies from Central European University in Budapest.

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Story Archive

Russian President Vladimir Putin leads a Cabinet meeting at the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow on Wednesday. Alexei Nikolsky/AP hide caption

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Alexei Nikolsky/AP

In Putin's Russia, An 'Adhocracy' Marked By Ambiguity And Plausible Deniability

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Russian Orthodox Believers Flock To Cathedral To See Saint's Remains

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Russian 'Adhocracy' Helps Create Cushion Of Plausible Deniability For Putin

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Anatoly Antonov smiles at an October 2016 briefing at Russia's Defense Ministry in Moscow. Antonov is "able to shift in a nanosecond from warmly charming to caustically sarcastic," says a former U.S. defense official. Ivan Sekretarev/AP hide caption

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Moscow's Likely New Ambassador To U.S.: 'Tough' And 'Not That Easy To Work With'

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Russia And U.S. Negotiate Russian Compounds Seized By U.S. Authorities

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New Russian Ambassador Expected To Take Tough Stance On U.S. Diplomacy

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Meet Anatoly Antonov, Set To Be Russia's Next Ambassador To U.S.

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Russian Leaders Downplay Latest Links Revealed In Trump Jr. Emails

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Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a meeting of the Commission for Military Technology Cooperation outside Moscow on Thursday, ahead of Friday's G-20 meeting in Hamburg. Alexei Druzhinin/AP hide caption

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Alexei Druzhinin/AP

Russia Aims To Guard Against Foreign Influence In Its Presidential Election

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Academpark is the technology park in Akademgorodok, a Siberian suburb that's Russia's answer to Silicon Valley. Lucian Kim/NPR hide caption

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In Russia's Siberian Silicon Valley, Business Is Good But Risks Can Be High

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In Russia's Tech Center, Scientists Face Rewarding But Unpredictable Life

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China's President Begins A 2-Day Trip To Russia

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Putin Fields Questions From Russian Citizens In Annual Live Call-In Show

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Anti-government protesters march in Novosibirsk, the capital of Siberia and Russia's third most populous city, with a banner reading "Corruption steals the future!" Lucian Kim/NPR hide caption

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