A reissue of Carissa's Wierd's best work sets mournfully deadpan vocals against a vibrant bed of strings and accordions. Brian Marr hide caption

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Brian Marr

'The Color That Your Eyes Changed With the Color of Your Hair' by Carissa's Wierd

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Sun Kil Moon's "Admiral Fell Promises" is an almost impossibly lovely and tender plea to a would-be lover. courtesy of the artist hide caption

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'Admiral Fell Promises' by Sun Kil Moon

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Active Child's "Wilderness" winds up somewhere truly beautiful: one part ambient electronica, one part bedroom folk. Brent Mullins hide caption

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Brent Mullins

'Wilderness' by Active Child

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As sweet strings and handclaps propel "Rio" along, Hey Marseilles offers up an endearing ode to adventure. courtesy of the artist hide caption

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'Rio' by Hey Marseilles

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Dave Matthews, seen here at Bonnaroo 2010, was a runaway winner of our Owned & Abandoned Sweepstakes. His prize: abandonment. Shantel Mitchell/for NPR hide caption

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Shantel Mitchell/for NPR

Folk-punk band O'Death performs at the 2010 Newport Folk Festival. Shantel Mitchell hide caption

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Shantel Mitchell

Newport Folk: An Old Festival Still Finds New Sounds

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Audio Only: Los Campesinos! Tiny Desk Concert

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Audio Only: 'Weird Al' Yankovic's Tiny Desk Concert

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Suzanne Vega is reinventing much of her catalog as stripped-down folk music. With 1987's "Gypsy," it's an easy task. courtesy of the artist hide caption

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'Gypsy' by Suzanne Vega

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Bill Fox's "Electrocution" is, in every way, a perfect fit for Nada Surf's sensibility and philosophy. Peter Ellenby hide caption

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Peter Ellenby

'Electrocution' by Nada Surf

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