"Nobody can soldier without coffee," a Union soldier wrote in 1865. (Above) Union soldiers sit with their coffee in tin cups, their hard-tack, and a kettle at their feet. Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection/Flickr The Commons hide caption

toggle caption Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection/Flickr The Commons

If War Is Hell, Then Coffee Has Offered U.S. Soldiers Some Salvation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/485227943/487303122" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lebanese chefs celebrate in Beirut after setting a new Guinness record for what was then the biggest tub of hummus in the world — weighing over 2 tons — in October 2009. The world record effort was part of Lebanon's bid to claim hummus as its own. Ramzi Haidar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Ramzi Haidar/AFP/Getty Images

Give Chickpeas A Chance: Why Hummus Unites, And Divides, The Mideast

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/483715410/486432965" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Curtis Carroll — also known as "Wall Street" — teaches prisoners at San Quentin State Prison about stocks. The Kitchen Sisters hide caption

toggle caption The Kitchen Sisters

Inmate With Stock Tips Wants To Be San Quentin's Warren Buffett

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/431958714/432192433" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Blue agaves grow in a plantation for the production of tequila in Arandas, Jalisco state, Mexico, in December 2010. In the past 20 years, tequila has become fashionable all over the world, demonstrating that producers' international sales strategy has been a great success. Hector Guerrero/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Hector Guerrero/AFP/Getty Images

Tequila Nation: Mexico Reckons With Its Complicated Spirit

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/323714694/325073894" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Australian celebrity chef and author Kylie Kwong (left) teaches a cooking workshop at Yaama Dhiyaan, a cooking and hospitality school for at-risk aborginal youth. The Kitchen Sisters hide caption

toggle caption The Kitchen Sisters

In Yabbies And Cappuccino, A Culinary Lifeline For Aboriginal Youth

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/322569875/322800447" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

French physicist Philippe Hubert uses gamma rays to detect radioactivity in wine. "In the wine is the story of the Atomic Age," he says. C J Walker/Courtesy of William Koch hide caption

toggle caption C J Walker/Courtesy of William Koch

How Atomic Particles Helped Solve A Wine Fraud Mystery

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/318241738/318414924" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A typical Russian kitchen inside an apartment built during the early 1960s, when Nikita Khrushchev led the Soviet Union — what later became known as Khrushchev apartments. Courtesy of The Kitchen Sisters hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of The Kitchen Sisters

How Soviet Kitchens Became Hotbeds Of Dissent And Culture

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/314961287/316269194" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Anna Matveevna came to this communal apartment in St. Petersburg in 1931, when she was 8 years old. Courtesy of European University, St. Petersburg, Russia,Colgate University and Cornell University hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of European University, St. Petersburg, Russia,Colgate University and Cornell University

How Russia's Shared Kitchens Helped Shape Soviet Politics

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/314054405/314138915" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A turnspit dog at work in a wooden cooking wheel in an inn at Newcastle, Carmarthen, Wales, in 1869. Ann Ronan Pictures/Print Collector/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Ann Ronan Pictures/Print Collector/Getty Images

Turnspit Dogs: The Rise And Fall Of The Vernepator Cur

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/311127237/312046610" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Francesco Galante leads the Libera Terra, a cooperative of farmers and producers who create food and jobs outside of the Mafia's control. The Kitchen Sisters hide caption

toggle caption The Kitchen Sisters

The Pizza Connection: Fighting The Mafia Through Food

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/306874351/309997204" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Teens dance at the club on Eel Pie Island in the 1960s. Courtesy of Dan van der Vat hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Dan van der Vat

From A British King To Rock 'N' Roll: The Slippery History Of Eel Pie Island

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/158704798/158715772" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Termite Queen And Her Ultimate Sacrifice

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/136028437/136064069" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People have long speculated about why girls love horses, according to Peggy Orenstein, author of Cinderella Ate My Daughter: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the New Girlie-Girl Culture. She says that by identifying with these dynamic, strong animals, girls are expressing their own power. Corbis hide caption

toggle caption Corbis

Why Do Girls Love Horses, Unicorns And Dolphins?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133600424/133629772" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Theresa Sparks is running for a spot on San Francisco's board of supervisors — and if elected, she will become the city's first transgender supervisor. Today, Sparks is open about her background — but for many years, she had a secret life. Courtesy Frank Gaglione/frankgaglione.com hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy Frank Gaglione/frankgaglione.com

From 'Secret Life' To Public Service

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/130703278/130843747" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Laren Weddell (left), Yasmeen Sandoval (middle) and Brittany Poor Bear (right) completed their womanhood ceremony this summer. Nikki Silva hide caption

toggle caption Nikki Silva

Four Days, Nights: A Girls' Coming-Of-Age Ceremony

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/129611281/129676165" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript