Wounded Warrior Battalions have been set up to help troops returning from combat recover from their injuries. But recent Pentagon reviews have found a pattern of overmedication in such battalions. Here, Marines assigned to Wounded Warrior Battalion East at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., graduate from a training course in January. Capt. Jill L. Wolf hide caption

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Wounded Warriors Face New Enemy: Overmedication

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The Marines' most senior officers — including top commander Gen. James Amos (shown here in 2011 in Afghanistan's Helmand province) — are weighing in on recent incidents involving misconduct by troops serving in Afghanistan. Bay Ismoyo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Military Wages Battle Against Misconduct

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Panetta Condemns Latest U.S. Troop Photo Scandal

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Line Of Defense: Arguments In Afghan Attack Case

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Afghanistan Shooting Suspect Held In Kansas Prison

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A U.S. soldier, part of the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force, stands outside a military base in Panjwai, Kandahar province, south of Kabul, on Sunday. Allauddin Khan/AP hide caption

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Killings A Blow To U.S. Strategy In Afghanistan

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Shooting Is Another Blow To U.S.-Afghan Relations

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Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, addresses a meeting in Tehran on Thursday. Khamenei is a staunch defender of Iran's nuclear program. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Experts: A Strike On Iran Poses Many Challenges

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Lt. Col. Mark Schmitt, who will be among a group of U.S. military trainers heading to Afghanistan soon, calls out orders during a mock attack on the model Afghan village at the U.S. military base in Fort Polk, La. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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In Mock Village, A New Afghan Mission Takes Shape

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The latest violence in Afghan has raised doubts about the U.S. strategy. Here, Afghan demonstrators shout anti-U.S. slogans as they carry a wounded man during a protest in the Western city of Herat on Feb. 24. Aref Karimi /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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US Strategy In Afghanistan Questioned Amid Violence

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Defense Secretary Leon Panetta (right) and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey listen to questions during a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on Capitol Hill Tuesday. Both men spoke about the U.S. military shifting its focus to Asia. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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As China's Military Grows, U.S. Assesses Risks

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U.S. Strategy For Afghan War Reaches Critical Stage

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Defense Goal: Combat Role In Afghan War Ends In '13

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Pentagon To Rethink Its Strategy, Cut Troops

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