Questions Remain After NATO Border Raid

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NATO Strike Adds To Damaged U.S.-Pakistani Ties

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Pentagon Faces Significant Cuts

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Defense Secretary Leon Panetta testifies on Capitol Hill on Nov. 15. He said the proposed cuts to the Pentagon budget would lead to a hollow force. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Does Supercommittee Failure Imperil Pentagon?

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Air Force Admits Losing Remains At Dover Mortuary

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Lance Cpl. Jake Romo does physical therapy at the Naval Medical Center in San Diego, Calif. He lost both legs in an explosion in Sangin, Afghanistan, in February 2011, while serving with the 3/5 Marines. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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For Wounded Marines, The Long, Hard Road Of Rehab

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Kait Wyatt carries her 1-month-old son, Michael, at the burial for her husband, Marine Cpl. Derek Wyatt, at Arlington National Cemetery, Jan. 7. Wyatt was killed Dec. 6, 2010, in Afghanistan. Kait Wyatt, who was pregnant at the time of her husband's death, was induced the day after he was killed so she could attend the service. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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A Marine's Death, And The Family He Left Behind

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Amy Murray at home with her daughter Harper in Oceanside, Calif. Her husband, Capt. Patrick Murray, with the Darkhorse battalion, returned home from Afghanistan, in April 2011; 25 Marines from his unit did not.

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As Casualties Mounted, So Did Marine Families' Fears

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U.S. Marines with 3rd Battalion, 5th Regiment and the Afghan National Army provide cover as they move out of a dangerous area after taking enemy sniper fire during a security patrol in Sangin, Afghanistan, in November 2010. During its seven-month deployment, the 3/5 sustained the highest casualty rate of any Marine unit during the Afghan war, losing 25 men.

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Cpl. David R. Hernandez/U.S. Marine Corps

An Afghan Hell On Earth For 'Darkhorse' Marines

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Lt. Col. Jason Morris pays his respects at a memorial service in Sangin, Afghanistan, on Nov. 26, 2010, for three Marines who were killed: Lance Cpl. Brandon Pearson, Lance Cpl. Matthew Broehm and 1st Lt. Robert Kelly. Morris commanded a battalion in volatile Helmand province that suffered the highest casualty rate of any Marine unit in the Afghanistan War.

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Lance Cpl. Joseph M. Peterson/U.S. Marine Corps

Afghan Success Comes At High Price For Commander

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Saturday begins the 11th year in the war in Afghanistan, and a new poll shows that veterans and the general public have different views on war, the value of military service — and even patriotism.

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Veterans, Civilians Don't See Eye To Eye On War

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A new poll by the Pew Research Center shows a significant divergence on attitudes toward war and military service between members of the military and civilians.

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Gap Grows Between Military, Civilians On War

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Marine Dakota Meyer poses during his deployment in Kunar province, Afghanistan. President Obama is awarding him the Medal of Honor on Thursday, making him the first living Marine to receive the honor since the Vietnam War. Anonymous/AP hide caption

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For A Marine Hero, A Medal Of Honor

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Panel Finds Massive Waste By Wartime Contractors

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At Walter Reed, Oscar Olguin and his family were visited by President Bush and first lady Laura Bush. But Olguin says that when he left the hospital, he had to fend for himself. Courtesy of Oscar Olguin hide caption

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Courtesy of Oscar Olguin

Walter Reed Was The Army's Wake-Up Call In 2007

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