Marines with Echo Company of the Second Battalion, Ninth Marines out of Camp Lejeune, guide their M-ATV, a Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle in to the district government compound in Marjah, Afghanistan. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Bagi Kheyl, in the eastern province of Ghazni, is one of the villages where the 82nd Airborne has been operating as part of a broader effort to drive away the Taliban. Amy Walters/NPR hide caption

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Amy Walters/NPR

For U.S. Troops, One More Big Push In Afghanistan

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Afghan local police officers wait outside a classroom at a training facility in Marjah. U.S. Marines are training local security forces how to maintain calm in the region. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Former Taliban Stronghold Faces The Post-U.S. Future

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At Forward Operating Base Payne in Afghanistan's Helmand province, Marine Cpl. Jonathan Odriscoll looks at pictures of his sister on Facebook. Troop access to social media has been both a blessing and curse for the military. Bay Ismoyo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bay Ismoyo/AFP/Getty Images

Military Addresses Double-Edged Sword Of Troops On Social Media

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A Marine Corps team carries the remains of Marine Sgt. J.P. Huling, 25, of West Chester, Ohio, at Dover Air Force Base, Del., on May 9. Huling was killed three days earlier by an Afghan soldier in southern Afghanistan, one of a growing number of such shootings. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

An Afghan Shoots, A Marine Dies, Mistrust Grows

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In Afghanistan, American troops are pushing Afghans to take charge. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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U.S. Military Mission: Pushing Afghans To Take Lead

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Taliban Takes Advantage Of Lull In U.S. Offensive

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U.S. troops are training Afghan soldiers to take more responsibility in the war against the Taliban. But the Afghans still depend heavily on the Americans. Here, an Afghan solider fills up gas cans with diesel fuel from a U.S. Army tanker in southern Afghanistan. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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As The Clock Ticks, Americans Train Afghan Troops

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Wounded Warrior Battalions have been set up to help troops returning from combat recover from their injuries. But recent Pentagon reviews have found a pattern of overmedication in such battalions. Here, Marines assigned to Wounded Warrior Battalion East at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., graduate from a training course in January. Capt. Jill L. Wolf hide caption

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Capt. Jill L. Wolf

Wounded Warriors Face New Enemy: Overmedication

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The Marines' most senior officers — including top commander Gen. James Amos (shown here in 2011 in Afghanistan's Helmand province) — are weighing in on recent incidents involving misconduct by troops serving in Afghanistan. Bay Ismoyo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Military Wages Battle Against Misconduct

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Panetta Condemns Latest U.S. Troop Photo Scandal

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Line Of Defense: Arguments In Afghan Attack Case

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Afghanistan Shooting Suspect Held In Kansas Prison

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A U.S. soldier, part of the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force, stands outside a military base in Panjwai, Kandahar province, south of Kabul, on Sunday. Allauddin Khan/AP hide caption

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Killings A Blow To U.S. Strategy In Afghanistan

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