Guy Raz 2014-2 i i
Kainaz Amaria/NPR
Guy Raz 2014-2
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Guy Raz

Host, TED Radio Hour

Guy Raz is the host of TED Radio Hour, a co-production of NPR and TED that takes listeners on a journey through the world of ideas. Each radio show is based on talks given by riveting speakers on the renowned TED stage, bound together by a common theme such as the thrill of space exploration, going to extremes, the source of happiness or 'when rights goes wrong' in our justice system. Since its official launch in March 2013, TED Radio Hour has become the fastest growing program in public radio history and one of the top podcasts in the United States.

Previously, Raz was weekend host of NPR News' signature afternoon newsmagazine All Things Considered. Raz was named host of that program in July 2009. During his tenure, Raz transformed the sound and format of the program, introducing the now-signature "cover story" and creating the popular "Three-Minute Fiction" writing contest.

Raz joined NPR in 1997 as an intern for All Things Considered and has worked virtually every job in the newsroom from temporary production assistant to breaking news anchor. His first job was the assistant to NPR's legendary news analyst Daniel Schorr.

In 2000, at the age of 25, Raz was made NPR's Berlin bureau chief where he covered Eastern Europe and the Balkans. During his six years abroad, Raz covered everything from wars and conflict zones to sports and entertainment. He reported from more than 40 countries including the wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, Macedonia and the ongoing conflict in Israel and the Palestinian territories.

He served as NPR's bureau chief in London and for a brief, two-year stint left NPR to work as CNN's Jerusalem correspondent chronicling everything from the rise of Hamas as a political power to the incapacitation of Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and Israel's 2005 withdrawal from the Gaza Strip. Two years later Raz returned to NPR to serve as defense correspondent where he covered the Pentagon and the US military.

For his reporting from Iraq, Raz was awarded both the Edward R. Murrow Award and the Daniel Schorr Journalism prize. His reporting has contributed to two duPont awards and one Peabody awarded to NPR. He's been a finalist for the Livingston Award four times. He's won the National Headliner Award and an NABJ award in addition to many others. In 2008, he spent a year as a Nieman journalism fellow at Harvard University where he studied classical history.

As a host and correspondent, Raz has interviewed and profiled more than 6,000 people including Christopher Hitchens, Condoleezza Rice, Jimmy Carter, Shimon Peres, General David Petraeus, Al Gore, Mark Zuckerberg, Bill Gates, Eminem, Taylor Swift and many, many others.

Raz has anchored live coverage on some of the biggest stories in recent years including the killing of Osama bin Laden, the Newtown School Shootings and the 2012 Presidential election.

He has also served as a Ferris professor of journalism at Princeton University and an adjunct professor of journalism at Georgetown. In 2015, he will teach journalism at George Washington University as a Shapiro Fellow.

Most importantly, Guy is a father. He's performed in DC children's theater as the narrator in "Cat in the Hat." He helped design the local playground in his neighborhood. And Guy is also known as the "Cokie Roberts for the 4-8-year-old crowd" as the news analyst for the Breakfast Blast Newscast on Kids Place Live on SiriusXM radio. You can catch his updates each Friday morning.

Raz is also an avid cyclist and in the summertime, a fanatical vegetable pickler.

More from Guy Raz

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Equipment for transporting and housing coal sits idle in Cowen, W.Va. Since the natural gas boom, several mines in Webster County have either slowed or shut down operation, laying off hundreds of workers. Guy Raz/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Guy Raz/NPR

Rancher Randy Thompson is fighting to keep the Keystone XL pipeline from being built in Nebraska. Guy Raz/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Guy Raz/NPR

Richard Holbrooke and Katharine Pierce as students in 1961 at Brown University. Katharine Pierce hide caption

itoggle caption Katharine Pierce