A waiter carries beer mugs during the 2012 Oktoberfest in Munich. Johannes Simon/Getty Images hide caption

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Berlin's Prenzlauer Berg neighborhood, like many others across the city, is experiencing a real estate boom. Housing prices have risen by as much as 20 percent in the past year in some German cities. Adam Berry/Getty Images hide caption

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Polling station officials count ballots in Cairo on Dec. 15, at the end of the first day of vote in a referendum on a new constitution. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Women wait in line outside a polling station to vote on a disputed constitution drafted by Islamist supporters of President Mohammed Morsi in Cairo on Saturday. Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

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The opening date of Germany's new Willy Brandt Berlin Brandenburg International Airport has been delayed three times due to construction delays and safety concerns. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel (right) has given guarded support to Education Minister Annette Schavan, who is facing calls to resign over allegations of plagiarism. Thomas Peter/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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The main street in Oberhausen — Germany's most indebted city — is dotted with vacancies. Despite its economic woes, Oberhausen, like other western German cities, must make "reunification" payments to the former communist East. The payments help explain German voters' reluctance to bail out Greece and other eurozone countries. Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammed Naeem, a driver, holds up a framed photo of two relatives he says were killed by militant leader Abdullah near the western city of Herat. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

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A money-changer in the Afghan city of Herat counts a stack of Iranian bills. More and more Iranian currency is being brought in by smugglers to exchange for dollars, which then go back to Iran. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

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A U.S. soldier shares grapes with Afghan boys in the southern province of Kandahar on Wednesday. Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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An Afghan man inspects a motorcycle used in a suicide attack in a parking lot holding dozens of trucks supplying the NATO-run Kandahar Air Base in June. Bombings and assassinations are on the rise in Kandahar. Last month, a suicide bomber struck the convoy of the provincial police chief, Gen. Abdul Raziq, who was severely injured. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Afghan girls walk home from school in Kunduz province earlier this year. Despite progress in recent years, girls who want an education face threats from the Taliban and other extremists, and sometimes even their own families. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. soldiers still patrol in Afghanistan, like this one speaking with a young man in the eastern province of Khost in August. However, Afghan forces are taking on increased responsibility as the U.S. draws down and prepares for its troops to leave by the end of 2014. Jose Cabezas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The aftermath of a truck bomb in Kandahar, the main city in southern Afghanistan, which wounded the provincial police chief and killed two civilians Monday. Taliban attacks against Afghan officials are up sharply this year. Mamoon Durani/AP hide caption

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Afghan soldiers (right) patrol with U.S. troops in the Panjwai district of southern Afghanistan in May. The two armies have been working together for years, but Afghan attacks against U.S. and NATO forces have been rising recently. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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