Christian landlord Ayman Dimitry, shown with his 5-year-old daughter, Juliena, says his ear was cut off by men who accused him of renting an apartment to Muslim prostitutes. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR

Women chant slogans and wave the Egyptian flag during a rally March 11 to support national unity of Muslims and Christians in Cairo's Tahrir Square, the focal point of the uprising that ousted Hosni Mubarak. Maya Alleruzzo/AP hide caption

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Hisham Haddad (left) stands with his brother, Hani, at the so-called Hyde Park in Suez, Egypt, while talking about the city's problems since the revolution. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

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An Egyptian soldier argues with protesters during a rally in Cairo's Tahrir Square in March against proposed constitutional amendments. Many in Egypt now say that the military, once embraced by anti-government protesters who forced President Hosni Mubarak from office, is bypassing civilian laws and courts. Grace Kassab/AP hide caption

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Iman al-Obeidi, who said she spent two days in detention after being arrested at a checkpoint in Tripoli, Libya, and was sexually assaulted by up to 15 men while in custody, shouted as she told her story at the Rixos hotel in Tripoli on Saturday (March 26, 2011). Jerome Delay/AP hide caption

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A soldier stands guard next to Tutankhamen's gold mask inside the Egyptian Museum on Feb. 16. Looters broke into the museum in Cairo's Tahrir Square in late January. Pedro Ugarte/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A young woman sells Egyptian flags in central Cairo on Monday. Voters are scheduled to go to the polls on Saturday for a referendum on proposed constitutional amendments. Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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