With the advent of radio and television, presidential charisma became a more important personality characteristic. Above, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who is rated one of the most charismatic presidents; John F. Kennedy; Bill Clinton. Getty Images hide caption

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Charming, Cold: Does Presidential Personality Matter?

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In a 2004 debate in St. Louis, President Bush answers a question as his opponent, Sen. John Kerry, listens. Both candidates used a number of "pivots" in their debates. Ron Edmonds/AP hide caption

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How Politicians Get Away With Dodging The Question

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Teachers interact differently with students expected to succeed. But they can be trained to change those classroom behaviors. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Teachers' Expectations Can Influence How Students Perform

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A less complicated time? Petula Clark holds her 1965 gold record for "Downtown," an uptempo song in a major key. R. McPhedran/Getty Images hide caption

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Why We're Happy Being Sad: Pop's Emotional Evolution

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Research shows that under certain circumstances, we can train ourselves to forget details about particular memories. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Can We Learn To Forget Our Memories?

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Would Judge Give Psychopath With Genetic Defect Lighter Sentence?

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Wanda Kaczynski and her son David Kaczynski (right background) are escorted to their car by defense lawyers after Unabomber Theodore Kaczynski pleaded guilty Jan. 22, 1998, in Sacramento, Calif. John G. Mabanglo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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When Your Family Member Does The Unthinkable

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Can Science Plant Brain Seeds That Make You Vote?

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Kimberly Payton, a teacher at the Small Savers Child Development Center, reads to a group of preschoolers in Washington, D.C., in 2010. Researchers say that teachers who make small changes in how they read to 4-year-olds can improve kids' reading skills later on. Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Small Change In Reading To Preschoolers Can Help Disadvantaged Kids Catch Up

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Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things

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People who are interested in and paying close attention to each other begin to speak more alike, a psychologist says. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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To Predict Dating Success, The Secret's In The Pronouns

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Republican presidential candidates Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney clashed often during Wednesday's GOP debate. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Inconsistency: The Real Hobgoblin

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More Children Struggle With Gender Identity Disorder

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The antidepressant Prozac selectively targets the chemical serotonin. Paul S. Howell/Getty Images hide caption

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When It Comes To Depression, Serotonin Isn't The Whole Story

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