Kimberly Payton, a teacher at the Small Savers Child Development Center, reads to a group of preschoolers in Washington, D.C., in 2010. Researchers say that teachers who make small changes in how they read to 4-year-olds can improve kids' reading skills later on. Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Small Change In Reading To Preschoolers Can Help Disadvantaged Kids Catch Up

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Psychology Of Fraud: Why Good People Do Bad Things

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People who are interested in and paying close attention to each other begin to speak more alike, a psychologist says. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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To Predict Dating Success, The Secret's In The Pronouns

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Republican presidential candidates Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney clashed often during Wednesday's GOP debate. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Inconsistency: The Real Hobgoblin

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More Children Struggle With Gender Identity Disorder

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The antidepressant Prozac selectively targets the chemical serotonin. Paul S. Howell/Getty Images hide caption

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When It Comes To Depression, Serotonin Isn't The Whole Story

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U.S. soldiers at Long Binh base, northeast of Saigon, line up to give urine samples at a heroin detection center in June 1971, before departing for the U.S. AP hide caption

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What Vietnam Taught Us About Breaking Bad Habits

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Indian firefighters attempt to put out a fire as smoke billows out of the historic Taj Mahal Hotel in Mumbai, which was stormed by armed gunmen in November 2008. Indranil Mukherjee/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Heroes Of The Taj Hotel: Why They Risked Their Lives

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New research suggests that people who are more creative are more likely to cheat. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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For Creative People, Cheating Comes More Easily

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Why Do We Give? Not Why Or How You Think

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A gun turret on the sunken Australian warship HMAS Sydney. All 645 people aboard the Sydney died. AP hide caption

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How Psychology Solved A WWII Shipwreck Mystery

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Kate Frego pins the turban of her mother, Aida Essenburg. Before Essenburg died in July of this year, she sat down with a dignity therapist to record the history of her life in what became a 50-page document. Courtesy of Kate Frego hide caption

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For The Dying, A Chance To Rewrite Life

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A boom sweeps around a tank at a sewage treatment plant in Coos Bay, Ore. Even though sewage water can be treated and cleaned, psychologists say getting the "cognitive sewage" out of the water is much more difficult. Jeff Barnard/AP hide caption

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Why Cleaned Wastewater Stays Dirty In Our Minds

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Can Therapy Help Change Sexual Orientation?

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