When oil washed ashore in Pensacola, Fla., it left an ugly stain that brought out hundreds of BP workers to clean the beach. It is uncertain how much money BP will have to pay in compensation, cleanup and penalties for the oil spill. Dave Martin/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Dave Martin/AP

Shrimp boats sit in the Pass Christian Harbor in Pass Christian, Miss. Many fishermen, seafood buyers and others in the Gulf operate with cash, which may cause problems when they cannot present the documents needed to receive government compensation. Dave Martin/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Dave Martin/AP

Cleanup workers maneuver an oil boom in Bataria Bay on the coast of Louisiana. With the down economy, their are plenty of people hoping for cleanup jobs, but there are few to be found. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Patrick Semansky/AP

Ryan Gressett (left) and Todd Schilla (right) pilot a remotely operated vehicle into the Gulf of Mexico with the goal of placing a small pollution containment chamber to contain an oil leak. U.S. Coast Guard, Petty Officer 3rd Class Patrick Kelley/AP hide caption

itoggle caption U.S. Coast Guard, Petty Officer 3rd Class Patrick Kelley/AP

Fishing boats sit idle on the docks at Bayou La Batre, Ala. Fishermen are just one of the groups that may file lawsuits against BP and other companies for damages or other losses as a result of the Gulf oil spill. Jay Reeves/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Jay Reeves/AP

A man picks up federal tax Form 1040 at a post office in Palo Alto, Calif., last April. Some of the wealthiest people in the U.S. want to pay higher taxes to help reduce the deficit. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Paul Sakuma/AP