Workplace bullying even happens at the NFL. Investigators concluded that Miami Dolphins lineman Jonathan Martin was harassed by other teammates. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
John Minchillo/AP

States Consider Bills To Crack Down On Workplace Bullies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/311889777/316269212" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In Rare Concession, Credit Suisse Admits Criminal Wrongdoing

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/313996741/313996742" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pfizer is pursuing British drugmaker AstraZeneca, in part because it wants to lower its tax rate by moving its headquarters to London. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Companies Face Backlash Over Foreign Mergers To Avoid U.S. Taxes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/312191035/312197678" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Some universities have stopped investing in coal companies, but many others don't see the point. An aerial view of the Coal Hollow Mine in Utah in 2012. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ethan Miller/Getty Images

When Colleges Ditch Coal Investments, It's Barely A Drop In The Bucket

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/310449120/310476562" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Postal workers take part in a march in Washington, D.C., on Thursday to protest the opening of U.S. Postal Service counters at Staples stores. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Postal Workers Protest At Staples Over Shift In Jobs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/306532699/306542188" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Monica Chavez packs up a box at an Amazon.com fulfillment center Dec. 2, in Phoenix. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ross D. Franklin/AP

Online Sales Taxes Shift Consumer Behavior, Study Shows

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/305953423/305960201" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

While many women continue to work with little change in their duties while pregnant, others find that pregnancy can be a career liability. Yuri Arcurs/iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
Yuri Arcurs/iStockphoto

When Being Pregnant Also Means Being Out Of A Job

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/304070037/304186996" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rhonda Sanderson and her ex-husband, John Amato III, shown here in 2010, helped make a business thrive after they divorced. Courtesy of Rhonda Sanderson hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Rhonda Sanderson

When Divorce Leads To A Happily Ever After For A Small Business

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/303677185/304041946" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In the hiring process, there are things employers aren't permitted to ask, like whether you plan to have kids. Some employers turn to social media to learn more about job candidates. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto

Can't Ask That? Some Job Interviewers Go To Social Media Instead

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/301791749/301882842" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"Too darn funny what a co-worker put on top of her lunch. It was fake of course, but got the point across." Courtesy of Toni Kinnard hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Toni Kinnard

Stop, Thief! When Colleagues Steal From The Office Fridge

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/297347789/298374058" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Danielle Probst, 50, works part-time in food service at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C. Previously, she worked in film and marketing and also had an internship at a social media marketing company. Jim Tuttle/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Tuttle/NPR

An Intern At 40-Something, And 'Paid In Hugs'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/293882686/297623193" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Some employees say e-cigarettes increase their productivity and help them steer clear of tobacco. But health regulators are looking into possible risks to e-cig users — and to co-workers. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto

OK To Vape In The Office? Cities, Feds And Firms Still Deciding

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/291139371/292471071" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In First Press Conference, New Fed Chair Goes Vague

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/291475112/291475116" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript