Yuki Noguchi
Linda Fittante

Yuki Noguchi

Correspondent, National Desk

Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Business Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington D.C. Since joining NPR in 2008, she's covered business and economic news, and has a special interest in workplace issues — everything from abusive working environments, to the idiosyncratic cubicle culture. In recent years she has covered the housing market meltdown, unemployment during the Great Recession, and covered the aftermath of the tsunami in Japan in 2011. As in her personal life, however, her coverage interests are wide-ranging, and have included things like entomophagy and the St. Louis Cardinals.

Prior to joining NPR, Yuki started her career as a reporter for The Washington Post. She reported on stories mostly about business and technology, and later became an editor.

Yuki grew up with a younger brother speaking her parents' native Japanese at home. She has a degree in history from Yale.

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One demonstrator advocates for paid sick leave at a 2013 rally outside New York's city hall. The city is now one of several in the U.S. to have passed a measure mandating paid sick days. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Dave Tobelmann worked for 33 years at General Mills before retiring five years ago. Not long after, he returned to the company, this time through a staffing firm specializing in retiree placement. Courtesy of Dave Tobelmann hide caption

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Protesters march in New York City on Dec. 4 to demand an increase in the minimum wage to $15 per hour. New York state's minimum wage rose to $8.75 on Wednesday. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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There were $3 trillion worth of corporate mergers in 2014. Comcast's proposed acquisition of fellow cable company Time Warner was the largest at $45 billion. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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In 2010, Omar Thornton killed eight colleagues in Manchester, Conn., before killing himself. Private employers used to create their own rules about guns on their property. But over the past five years, many states have adopted laws that allow employees to keep firearms in their vehicles at work. Douglas Healey/Getty Images hide caption

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McDonald's says that same-store sales in its U.S. locations dropped nearly 5 percent in November, continuing a downward trend. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Too much partying at the office holiday bash can lead to lawsuits, firings or just plain awkwardness. Bill Sykes Images/Getty Images hide caption

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President Obama after discussing his executive actions on immigration Friday at Del Sol High School in Las Vegas. Business groups say the plan does little to help U.S. employers attract foreign workers. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Paul Smith, a single father and a longtime cook at the Trump Taj Mahal Casino in Atlantic City, is worried about losing his health benefits if the casino closes in December. Rob Szypko/NPR hide caption

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Atlantic City, N.J., has seen four casinos close this year, and a fifth may soon follow. Officials are trying to diversify the city's economy by weaning itself from gambling, its biggest industry. Yuki Noguchi/NPR hide caption

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Nearly 90 percent of companies do formal evaluations at least once a year, according to the Society for Human Resource Management. Zack Blanton/iStockphoto hide caption

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