Yuki Noguchi
Linda Fittante

Yuki Noguchi

Correspondent, Business Desk

Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Business Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington D.C. Since joining NPR in 2008, she's covered business and economic news, and has a special interest in workplace issues — everything from abusive working environments, to the idiosyncratic cubicle culture. In recent years she has covered the housing market meltdown, unemployment during the Great Recession, and covered the aftermath of the tsunami in Japan in 2011. As in her personal life, however, her coverage interests are wide-ranging, and have included things like entomophagy and the St. Louis Cardinals.

Prior to joining NPR, Yuki started her career as a reporter for The Washington Post. She reported on stories mostly about business and technology, and later became an editor.

Yuki grew up with a younger brother speaking her parents' native Japanese at home. She has a degree in history from Yale.

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Story Archive

Retraining generally isn't a top priority in the retail sector, analysts say. But Wal-Mart trains about a quarter-million of its employees a year in more advanced skills. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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The Dow Jones industrial average and other stock indexes fell sharply Wednesday, as investors worried about political turmoil in Washington. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Dow Jones Drops By 300 Points As Trump Remains Embroiled In Controversy

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Sandy Robson (left) and Crystal Hall rally for legislation for paid sick leave on April 11, 2016, in Annapolis, Md. Under a bill recently sent to Gov. Larry Hogan, businesses with 15 or more full-time employees would be required to allow workers to earn at least five paid sick days a year. Brian Witte/AP hide caption

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Brian Witte/AP

Businesses Push Back On Paid-Sick-Leave Laws

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J.C. Penney is among several chains that have announced plans to close stores this year. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

Retailers Scrambling To Adjust To Changing Consumer Habits

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Delta recently authorized supervisors to offer up to $9,950 in compensation to passengers bumped from flights. A Delta Air Lines jet sits at a gate at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Flight Overbooked? Perfect: These Frequent Flyers Want To Get Bumped

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Fox News has been the focus of sexual harassment claims that resulted in the ouster of former CEO Roger Ailes and host Bill O'Reilly. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Fox News Turmoil Highlights Workplace Culture's Role In Sexual Harassment

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U.S. Courts Divided Over Anti-Discrimination Protections For LGBT Workers

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United Airlines Continues To Deal With PR Disaster After Passenger Incident

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Google self-driving cars are shown outside the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, Calif., in May 2014. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Self-Driving Cars Raise Questions About Who Carries Insurance

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Inmates from the Eastern Correctional Facility listen as professor Delia Mellis leads a class on the Cold War. More than 300 students are enrolled in the Bard Prison Initiative each semester, within a curriculum that offers over 60 courses. Cameron Robert/NPR hide caption

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College Classes In Maximum Security: 'It Gives You Meaning'

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President Trump, left, greets House Ways And Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady, the lead author of Republicans' tax reform plans, before a meeting to discuss the American Health Care Act on March 10 at the White House. Analysts say the GOP's failure to pass its Obamacare alternative bodes poorly for Brady's tax package. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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What Failure On Obamacare Repeal Means For Tax Reform

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