Yuki Noguchi Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Business Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington D.C.
Yuki Noguchi
Linda Fittante

Yuki Noguchi

Correspondent, Business Desk

Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Business Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington D.C. Since joining NPR in 2008, she's covered business and economic news, and has a special interest in workplace issues — everything from abusive working environments, to the idiosyncratic cubicle culture. In recent years she has covered the housing market meltdown, unemployment during the Great Recession, and covered the aftermath of the tsunami in Japan in 2011. As in her personal life, however, her coverage interests are wide-ranging, and have included things like entomophagy and the St. Louis Cardinals.

Prior to joining NPR, Yuki started her career as a reporter for The Washington Post. She reported on stories mostly about business and technology, and later became an editor.

Yuki grew up with a younger brother speaking her parents' native Japanese at home. She has a degree in history from Yale.

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Story Archive

Most employers have policies on reporting sexual harassment, and human resources officials are required to investigate those claims. But those filing the complaints can face obstacles, experts say. Shannon Fagan/Getty Images hide caption

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Harvey Weinstein Case Highlights Pitfalls Of Workplace Harassment Claims

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Prohibitions on collective arbitration are the focus of three cases heard by the Supreme Court this week. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

No Class Action: Supreme Court Weighs Whether Workers Must Face Arbitrations Alone

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People gather around a speaker during a lunchtime seminar at a WeWork co-working space in Washington, D.C. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Co-Working Spaces Are Redefining What It Means To Go To The Office

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The opioid industry expanded in the 1990s in response to the medical community's push to better treat pain and chronic pain with drugs such as oxycodone. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey, who plans to sue Equifax, called the breach "the most brazen failure to protect consumer data we have ever seen." bernie_photo/iStock hide caption

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After Equifax Hack, Consumers Are On Their Own. Here Are 6 Tips To Protect Your Data

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A person visits a Miami store that doesn't have electricity on Tuesday. Much of Florida was without power two days after Hurricane Irma battered the state. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Florida Businesses Struggle To Reopen Without Power After Irma

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Destini Johnson gets a hug from her mother. She was released unexpectedly early because, she tells her parents, the jail was overcrowded. Seth Herald for NPR hide caption

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Seth Herald for NPR

The Powerful Pull Of Opioids Leaves Many 'Missing' From U.S. Workforce

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Nate Miller is the owner of Express Employment Professionals, a staffing agency in Muncie, Ind., that screens and places workers at local manufacturing companies. Yuki Noguchi/NPR hide caption

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Opioid Crisis Looms Over Job Market, Worrying Employers And Economists

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Google Memo Raises Questions About Limits Of Free Speech In The Workplace

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Justice Department Argues Sexual Orientation Not Protected By Civil Rights Laws

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Filling Labor Board Vacancies Opens Door To Unwinding Obama-era Policies

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Labor Department Starts To Roll Back Obama Overtime Rule

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In 2015, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti (center) signs into law an ordinance raising the city's minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2020. Though California isn't one of them, 27 states have passed laws requiring cities to abide by state minimums. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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As Cities Raise Minimum Wages, Many States Are Rolling Them Back

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Micromanagement can kill motivation, employee creativity and job satisfaction. It's the biggest beef many workers have about their boss. sorbetto/iStock hide caption

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Is Your Boss Too Controlling? Many Employees Clash With Micromanagers

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