A truck drives through a flooded street caused by Hurricane Sandy in New York City's Financial District on Tuesday. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Waves crash over a road as Hurricane Sandy comes up the coast Monday in Winthrop, Mass. Economists are predicting the storm will cost tens of billions of dollars. Darren McCollester/Getty Images hide caption

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About 34 million taxpayers take the mortgage interest deduction, for a typical savings of approximately $600 a year. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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A Ford Focus on the assembly line in Wayne, Mich. "We have a lot going for us; we've got our problems, but others have problems that are as bad or worse," says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist at IHS Global Insight. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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The Dow Jones industrial average dropped more than 500 points on Oct. 19, 1987, in the stock market crash known as Black Monday. Bettmann/Corbis hide caption

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An audience member holds up his hand at a Mitt Romney town hall meeting in Dayton, Ohio, in March. Audience members will be allowed to ask questions at the second presidential debate, being held Tuesday night in Hempstead, N.Y. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Democrats say the economy is growing and jobs consistently are being added. But Republicans note that the pace is far too slow to absorb the more than 12 million people still looking for work. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Job seekers fill out applications Aug. 21 at a construction job fair in New York. Polls show voters want the presidential candidates to provide more details on how they would reduce unemployment, change tax policy and alter government spending. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Economists hope lawmakers can avert a "fiscal cliff" after November's election, but what if Congress runs out of time? Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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