Acura MDX sport utility vehicles roll off the assembly line at a Honda plant in Lincoln, Ala., in May. Overseas investors have U.S. assets totaling nearly $4 trillion, including auto plants, banks and mines. Joe Songer/AL.com/Landov hide caption

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Hans Kahl (left) speaks with prospective employees at a job fair for veterans, in Miami on Tuesday. With job growth still slow, the Federal Reserve may keep trying to stimulate the economy. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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A motorist fuels up at a service station in Springfield, Ill. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Declining Gas Prices Pump Up A Shaky Economy

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The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, D.C., where the federal government shutdown left policymakers without key economic data. J. David Ake/AP hide caption

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The annual meetings of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank began Thursday in Washington amid a partial government shutdown. Many delegates are concerned that the U.S. budget impasse may threaten global economic stability. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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NPR's Chris Arnold reports on the meetings, where dysfunction in Washington is a hot topic.

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President Obama stands with Janet Yellen, his choice to lead the Federal Reserve Board, at the White House on Wednesday. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono speaks Tuesday at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit on the Indonesian resort island of Bali. President Obama missed the meeting due to the budget impasse in Washington. Beawiharta/Pool/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Even without official Labor Department data, economists estimated jobs grew moderately last month. Andrey Popov/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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JPMorgan Chase trader Frederick Reimer works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. The government's monthly jobs numbers won't be released as scheduled Friday, leaving financial markets without key data to evaluate the economy. Brendan McDermid/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Craig Thoricht's wife Linda. Courtesy of Craig Thoricht hide caption

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Reporting On The Shutdown, One Facebook Post At A Time

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Government workers protest the possibility of a federal shutdown in Chicago. Nearly 100 employees from federal agencies including the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Housing and Urban Development rallied in a downtown plaza Monday. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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Since the recession ended, small businesses have started to rebound. But they still face headwinds. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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