Marilyn Geewax Marilyn Geewax is a senior editor, assigning and editing business radio stories. She also serves as the national economics correspondent for the NPR web site, and regularly discusses economic issues on NPR's mid-day show Here & Now.
Doby Photography/NPR
Marilyn Geewax
Doby Photography/NPR

Marilyn Geewax

Senior Business Editor, Business News Desk

Marilyn Geewax is a senior editor, assigning and editing business radio stories. She also serves as the national economics correspondent for the NPR web site, and regularly discusses economic issues on NPR's mid-day show Here & Now.

Her work contributed to NPR's 2011 Edward R. Murrow Award for hard news for "The Foreclosure Nightmare." Geewax also worked on the foreclosure-crisis coverage that was recognized with a 2009 Heywood Broun Award.

Before joining NPR in 2008, Geewax served as the national economics correspondent for Cox Newspapers' Washington Bureau. Before that, she worked at Cox's flagship paper, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, first as a business reporter and then as a columnist and editorial board member. She got her start as a business reporter for the Akron Beacon Journal.

Over the years, she has filed news stories from China, Japan, South Africa and Europe. Recently, she headed to Europe to participate in the RIAS German/American Journalist Exchange Program.

Geewax was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard, where she studied economics and international relations. She earned a master's degree at Georgetown University, focusing on international economic affairs, and has a bachelor's degree from The Ohio State University.

She is a member of the National Press Club's Board of Governors and serves on the Global Economic Reporting Initiative Committee for the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

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Story Archive

President Trump holds up a signed memorandum calling for a trade investigation of China at the White House on Monday. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Trump Turns To 43-Year-Old 'America First' Trade Law To Pressure China

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White House adviser Kellyanne Conway said in an interview on Thursday that the federal disclosure rules could be too cumbersome. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Earlier this year, Frankfurt, Germany-based Deutsche Bank paid a $425 million fine for its involvement in a money-laundering scheme with Russian clients. Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump's son Donald Trump Jr. speaks at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland on July 19. On Tuesday Trump Jr. released an email exchange he had about meeting with a Russian lawyer earlier that summer. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Question Hanging Over Washington: Did Donald Trump Jr. Break The Law?

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Outgoing ethics director Walter Shaub said in January that President Trump's plan to reduce conflicts of interest "doesn't meet the standards ... that every president in the past four decades has met." Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Ethics Office Director Walter Shaub Resigns, Saying Rules Need To Be Tougher

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Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., is among the more than 190 Democrats who are suing President Trump over his business deals involving foreign governments. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh (left) and District of Columbia Attorney General Karl Racine announce a lawsuit against President Trump over conflicts of interest with his businesses on Monday in Washington. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, questions Treasury Secretary-designate Steven Mnuchin at his confirmation hearing in January. On Thursday, Brown asked Mnuchin for a list of Trump business associates. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

President Trump's lawyers said that a decade's worth of his tax returns show he doesn't owe money to Russian lenders and that he has received no income from Russian sources, with "a few exceptions." Without copies of those returns, these statements cannot be verified. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Nicole Kushner Meyer (third from left), the sister of White House senior adviser Jared Kushner, poses at a promotional event in Shanghai on Sunday. Albee Zhang/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Albee Zhang/AFP/Getty Images

Kushner Family Business Pitch In China Prompts Questions About Investor Visas

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Corey Lewandowski, a former Trump campaign manager, stepped down from a lobbying firm he'd founded after it was revealed he hadn't registered as as lobbyist. VIEW press/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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VIEW press/Corbis via Getty Images