Marilyn Geewax i
Doby Photography/NPR
Marilyn Geewax
Doby Photography/NPR

Marilyn Geewax

Senior Business Editor, Business News Desk

Marilyn Geewax is a senior editor, assigning and editing business radio stories. She also serves as the national economics correspondent for the NPR web site, and regularly discusses economic issues on NPR's mid-day show Here & Now.

Her work contributed to NPR's 2011 Edward R. Murrow Award for hard news for "The Foreclosure Nightmare." Geewax also worked on the foreclosure-crisis coverage that was recognized with a 2009 Heywood Broun Award.

Before joining NPR in 2008, Geewax served as the national economics correspondent for Cox Newspapers' Washington Bureau. Before that, she worked at Cox's flagship paper, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, first as a business reporter and then as a columnist and editorial board member. She got her start as a business reporter for the Akron Beacon Journal.

Over the years, she has filed news stories from China, Japan, South Africa and Europe. Recently, she headed to Europe to participate in the RIAS German/American Journalist Exchange Program.

Geewax was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard, where she studied economics and international relations. She earned a master's degree at Georgetown University, focusing on international economic affairs, and has a bachelor's degree from The Ohio State University.

She is a member of the National Press Club's Board of Governors and serves on the Global Economic Reporting Initiative Committee for the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., at the National Press Club Wednesday. Warren was critical of President Obama's plan to change how U.S. multinational companies are taxed. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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The average wholesale price of turkeys was $1.35 per pound in mid-November. But the retail price of frozen tom turkeys has fallen to an average of 87 cents a pound. Why? Because grocers know cheap turkeys draw customers into the store. Larry Crowe/AP hide caption

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Low-wage workers and supporters protest for a $15 an hour minimum wage Tuesday in New York City as part of what organizers called a National Day of Action. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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April Thompson makes a purchase at Legacy Team Sales in Ocala, Fla., in September. Economists say October's surprisingly strong job growth will encourage the Federal Reserve to hike interest rates next month. So holiday shoppers may pay more for using credit cards. Doug Engle/Ocala Star-Banner/Landov hide caption

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President Obama tours a General Electric gas engines factory in Waukesha, Wis., on Jan. 30, 2014. GE has recently said it would shift hundreds of jobs abroad because of the Export-Import Bank's inability to help finance international deals. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Unless Congress raises the debt limit by Nov. 3, the U.S. Treasury may be left with only incoming taxes and fees to cover expenses, which would not be enough to pay all bills. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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President Barack Obama speaks about the Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP, at the Agriculture Department in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 6. Nicholas Kamm /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Capterpillar says it plans to lay off up to 10,000 workers, with many of those cuts coming in Illinois, amid a slide in equipment orders. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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