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Residential Wells Near Seacoast Landfill Test Below State Threshold for PFCs

Residential water sources near a Superfund site on the Seacoast have tested below the state's standard for perfluorichemicals - including PFOA. Earlier tests at the site showed PFCs at levels significantly higher than the state standard. Sixteen residential wells near the former Coakley landfill were tested for perfluorichemicals following the discovery of those contaminants in monitoring wells at the landfill earlier this year. All of the residential wells tested showed PFC levels below the recently established state standard.

Residential Wells Near Seacoast Landfill Test Below State Threshold for PFCs

Plan for Regional Ocean Use Gets Public Comment in Portsmouth

A group representing New England states and federal agencies held a meeting Sunday in Portsmouth to get public input on their plan to coordinate the use of the region's ocean resources. The Northeast Regional Planning Body was designed to coordinate the interests of a whole host of parties interested in how the ocean gets used, from commercial fishing to transportation to national security. The group includes representatives from all six New England states and nine federal agencies.

Up Close and Personal with N.H.'s Catch and Release Bear Program

Growing up in Loudon, Andrew Timmins didn't see his first bear until he was nearly 20. Now, as Fish & Game's Bear Project leader, Timmins manages the state's population of more than 5,500 bears. NHPR's Sean Hurley recently spent a day with Timmins at a bear hotspot at the Attitash Ski Resort and learned how the state regularly catches troublesome bears and relocates them to the northernmost part of the state.

An Ice Storm in a Teapot: Researchers Spray Trees to Simulate Devastating Winter Storms

There's nothing that strikes more fear into the heart of a New England driver than the words "ice storm." But this pernicious wintery precipitation is not just trouble for cars. Forests, where a thick coating of ice can break limbs or bring down a whole tree, suffer too.

An Ice Storm in a Teapot: Researchers Spray Trees to Simulate Devastating Winter Storms

Emotions Run High as Fish and Game Considers Bobcat Trapping

Should New Hampshire sportsman be allowed to hunt and trap bobcats? Since the idea of a season on bobcats was first put on the table more than a year ago, that question has stirred up strong emotions, and those emotions came to a head Monday night. The proposal Fish and Game is weighing would let New Hampshire hunters and trappers kill 50 bobcats a year. There are more than 600 such trappers, and permits would be given out using a lottery, at $100 a pop. "[The hunt] was closed a time back when numbers were deemed to be too few," Ted Tichy, Chair of the Fish and Game commission summed it up at the start of the hearing, "and now we've done some studies and the numbers have come up and so we're listening to a proposal to reopen the season." Fish and Game believes there around 1,400 bobcats in the state, and the population is growing by maybe 150 a year. They think killing 50 cats a year is a small enough number that the population can still grow. But this proposal has become incredibly

Solar Developers Say N.H. Lawmakers' Compromise Doesn't Go Far Enough

The future of solar power in the Granite State was front and center in the New Hampshire statehouse Wednesday, as law makers presented a deal to extend a program that has been crucial to the development of the state's solar energy industry called net metering. All of the state's utilities are either approaching or have reached statutory limits on net-metering, which is the policy that gives renewable energy generators better rates for their surplus energy. Net-metering is lets solar panel owners spin their meter backwards by selling excess energy back to the grid at the same rate as they pay per kilowatt hour. The program has been seen as an essential ingredient in every state that has a solar market of any size, and fights around net-metering (the most recent example of which can be seen in Nevada) have flared up all around the country. Currently the statewide cap on how much solar can take advantage of this arrangement is 50 megawatts, and a proposed bill would increase it to 75 in

Solar Developers Say N.H. Lawmakers' Compromise Doesn't Go Far Enough

EPA Chief Comes to N.H. to Boost Biomass

The Obama Administration's top environmental regulator, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy, was in New Hampshire today promoting the use of wood as a fuel. McCarthy took a tour of sawmill in Middleton that burns leftover wood scraps to generate electricity and to heat its facility. McCarthy says that burning wood for electricity can be an important part of a low-carbon future, but under the President's new Clean Power Plan — which mandates a 32 percent reduction in emissions nationwide from 2005 levels by 2030 — only energy from biomass harvested using sustainable forestry practices will count as carbon neutral when calculating state emissions. "States like New Hampshire have had centuries of understanding what sustainable forestry really means, and we want to make sure that EPA learns from that and encourages the use of appropriate biomass in state plans going forward," she said in an interview after the event. McCarthy said that today the EPA has announced it would host a workshop to

Fish and Game Updating Blueprint for Next Ten Years of N.H. Wildlife

In Londonderry, bush-whacking through some seriously thick brush, Fish and Game field biologists Brett Ferry and Tyler Mahard are hunting for rabbits, but instead of firearms they're using traps and radio telemetry. They will take blood samples and put radio collars on rabbits they capture to ensure that we will continue to have a good idea of the state of the threatened rabbit population, and a few will be sent to a captive breeding program at a zoo in Rhode Island. Around a decade ago, Stonyfield Yogurt was looking to expand a parking lot in this area, which is also home to one of the last two remaining New Hampshire populations of New England Cottontail. The company worked out a deal with Fish and Game: in exchange for the parking lot in one location, they would do habitat restoration at this site. "Restoring habitat for rabbits means getting young forests growing again, cutting down trees and favoring shrubs, they like really dense thickets," says John Kanter, who lead up Fish and

N.H. Joins Diverse Coalition Of States, Countries Pledging To Reduce CO2 Emissions

New Hampshire has joined 48 other states and cities to sign a non-binding agreement to reduce carbon emissions by 80 percent by 2050. The pledge is called the Under 2 MOU (MOU is short for memorandum of understanding, and "Under 2" refers to the goal of keeping temperatures from increasing more than 2 degrees Celsius). It got started in May with twelve original signers, including US states like Vermont and California but also Catalonia, Spain, Ontario Canada and Acre, Brazil. Today Lombardy and Sardinia, Italy will join the group along with New Hampshire, meaning the signers represent more than 500 million people. The signers are mostly "subnational," meaning states and provinces, but a few countries are on board as well. "That represents $14.7 trillion dollars' worth of GDP and if you put them all together you'd get an economy that would be second largest in the world, second only to the United States," says Alex Barnum, with the California EPA. In a statement Governor Maggie Hassan

N.H. Joins Diverse Coalition Of States, Countries Pledging To Reduce CO2 Emissions

Sea Level Rise: A Bipartisan Problem That's Not Making Waves in the N.H. Primary

Thirty-five mayors and other local elected officials from coastal communities all over the country gathered in New Hampshire this weekend to talk about Sea Level Rise. They came from both parties, and they didn't wind up in the state that hosts the nation's first primary by accident. Basically anywhere with a coast was represented. From the South - like Pass Christian, Mississippi - which Mayor Chipper McDermott described as "a 316-year-old town that on August 29th, 2005 went from the 21st century to the 18th century in nine short hours with the mother of all storms, Katrina." From California, from Florida, and from the east coast, such as Newburyport and Plum Island, where Mayor Donna Holaday says "every time there's a storm coming every news channel is arriving on the island to try to capture the next house that will fall into the Atlantic Ocean." In coastal communities across the country rising seas are a problem across party lines – there were actually more Republicans at this

Sea Level Rise: A Bipartisan Problem That's Not Making Waves in the N.H. Primary

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